Diabetes headlines

Delhi schools lead fight against diabetes

A number of schools in Delhi will be among the first in India to receive information and training on how to educate teachers, students and parents on diabetes (type 1 and type 2). A joint initiative by the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), HRIDAY (Health Related Information Dissemination Amongst Youth), the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Sanofi India Limited, the KiDS (Kids and Diabetes in Schools) 'School Diabetes Information Pack' was released last week in Delhi.

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Source: India Today


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Rise of diabetes among Indian kids a cause for concern

Organisations like the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) are looking to keep diabetes under control among young, school-going children by launching programmes like the Kids and Diabetes in School (KiDS) project.

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Source: Business Standard


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City schools to lead fight against diabetes

Select Delhi schools will be among the first in the country to receive training on how to educate teachers, students and parents on diabetes.

The Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), Health Related Information Dissemination Amongst Youth (HRIDAY), International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Sanofi India Limited on Wednesday announced the roll-out of the KiDS (Kids and Diabetes in Schools) ‘School Diabetes Information Pack’ designed for public and private schools in Delhi. It was released in the presence of senior government officials. The KiDS initiative launched in India last September is a school-based intervention that aims to counteract diabetes-related discrimination and foster a supportive learning environment in schools about both types of diabetes.

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Source: The Hindu


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Health officials weigh national efforts to tackle non-communicable diseases, as UN launches new report

With world leaders gathered today in New York for the United Nations General Assembly’s review of efforts made since 2011 in controlling non-communicable diseases like heart disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic lung disease, the Organizations’ top health official launched a new report that shows progress at the national level has been insufficient and uneven.

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Source: UN News Centre


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Non-communicable diseases: healthy living needs global governance

Lawrence O. Gostin calls for action on nutrition, pollution and the built environment to curb non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

Rapid travel, mass migration and the globalization of culture are known to fuel the spread of infectious diseases. The same factors are also increasing the incidence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease. As developing countries prosper, these conditions are a by-product of rising air pollution, physical inactivity, and consumption of alcohol, tobacco and excess calories.

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Source: Nature


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Diabetes drugs 'may not be best'

The downsides of taking medication for type-2 diabetes may exceed the benefits for some patients, researchers have advised.

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Source: BBC Health


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Call to halve target for added sugar

People need to more than halve their intake of added sugar to tackle the obesity crisis, according to scientific advice for the government in England.

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Source: BBC


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Study finds pre-diabetes rate in England almost as high as U.S.

More than one-third of adults in England have pre-diabetes, putting the country nearly on par with rates in the United States, according to a study released this week.

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Source: Reuters


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Higher doses of statins linked to diabetes risk

People with heart problems who were started on cholesterol-lowering statins were more likely to develop diabetes if they were prescribed stronger versions of the drugs, a new study finds.

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Source: Reuters Health


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Sleep apnea tied to diabetes in large study

In the largest study to date of the relationship between sleep apnea and diabetes, a new study of more than 8,500 Canadian patients has demonstrated a link between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the development of diabetes, confirming earlier evidence of such a relationship from smaller studies with shorter follow-up periods.

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Source: Medical Xpress


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