World Diabetes Day

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President's editorial

Footcare education for people with diabetes: a major challenge

Although diabetes-related amputations are preventable, for too many people around the world, losing a limb or part of a limb is a tragic consequence of having diabetes. The high rates of these amputations are an indication of inadequacies in the delivery of health care, which create enormous challenges for those attempting to access high quality foot education and care. In this article, Margaret McGill focuses on current recommendations for health-care providers and makes a call for an individualized approach to diabetes foot care.

Screening for the diabetic foot: how and why

Given the dimensions of the current global diabetes pandemic, the number of people who are at risk of developing a diabetes-related foot complication is enormous – and growing. Everybody with the condition is at risk, irrespective of the type or severity of their diabetes. The aim of screening is to identify the people who are at greatest risk in order to allocate to them limited medical resources. Several simple screening techniques exist that can help to distribute therapeutic and preventive foot care to those in greatest need. Edgar Peters reports.

Understanding the development of diabetic foot complications

Foot complications are the leading cause of hospitalization in people with diabetes. Losing a limb is one of the most dreaded complications of the condition – with reason: compared to those without the condition, people with diabetes have a 15-fold increased risk of suffering an amputation. In this article, Vilma Urbancic-Rovan describes the pathophysiology of diabetes foot damage and argues that the amputation rate could be significantly reduced with improved care and education for people with the condition.

Diabetes foot damage in developing countries: the urgent need for education

Figures released by the International Diabetes Federation suggest that worldwide in 2003 there were almost 200 million people with diabetes – a global prevalence of 5.1%. The report predicted that over the coming decade, the greatest increases in the numbers of people with the condition will occur in Africa and Asia, provoking hugely increased rates of death and disability. Diabetes foot complications constitute a major public health problem, particularly for people with diabetes in developing countries. In this article, Zulfiqarali Abbas and Stephan Morbach look

Religion, politics and the diabetic foot in Senegal

Sixty seven-year-old Venerable Karamogo is the spiritual and community leader of a village in the South of Senegal. About nine years after Karamogo was diagnosed with diabetes, a chronic infection developed in his left leg. The surgeons recommended amputation; but this advice was firmly rejected by Karamogo and his family.

The psycho-social impact of diabetes foot damage

Over half of all lower-extremity amputations are related to diabetes. Indeed, foot ulceration is an increasing problem worldwide and there is little evidence of a reduction in the numbers of foot ulcers and amputations in people with diabetes.

Counting the costs of the diabetic foot

Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires a life-long commitment of resources to the prevention and treatment of complications. The condition affects an increasing number of people all around the world, putting them at risk for foot ulcers and amputations. In addition to causing acute suffering, foot lesions in people with diabetes have substantial economic consequences: up to 20% of total expenditure on diabetes might be attributable to the diabetic foot. Jan Apelqvist and Gunnel Ragnarson Tennvall report on the economic impact of diabetes foot damage

The diabetic foot: epidemiology, risk factors and the status of care

The development of foot problems is not an inevitable consequence of having diabetes. Indeed, most foot lesions are preventable. However, recent statistics are somewhat depressing: approximately a quarter of all people with diabetes worldwide at some point during their lifetime will develop sores or breaks (ulcers) in the skin of their feet. Moreover, as the number of people with diabetes rises worldwide, there can be little doubt that the burden of diabetes-related foot

Keeping people's feet perfect

Guest editor's editorial

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