World Diabetes Day

English

A good year for feet

President's editorial

Key aspects of care after a lower-limb amputation

Of all the lower extremity amputations carried out worldwide, 40%-70% are related to diabetes. In people with the condition, ulceration is provoked by diabetesinduced nerve damage, reduced mobility due to alterations in the functioning of joints in the foot, and disorders in the blood vessels that supply the legs and feet (peripheral vascular disease). When a person’s ulcerated foot becomes infected or when the blood supply is severely impaired, amputation of the foot – or even the leg – may not be preventable. People with diabetes who have suffered an amputation

Achieving excellence in diabetes foot care: one step at a time

By the time you finish reading this paragraph, it is likely that at least one person has lost part of a foot or leg through diabetic foot disease. This happens every 30 seconds. An amputation is often preceded by an ulcer; 15% of people with diabetes are affected by a foot ulcer at some time in their life. With the global diabetes population set to rise to 333 million by 2025, there is an urgent need for a co-ordinated preventive clinical response to reduce the impact of the diabetic foot.

The year of the diabetic foot

The human and economic consequences of the diabetic foot are extreme. Due to various complications of diabetes, a person’s foot can become vulnerable. Nerve

World Diabetes Day 2000

World Diabetes Day 2000 focused on “Diabetes and Lifestyle in the New Millennium”. It was an occasion to (re)discover the benefits of a healthy lifestyle and the ways in which to lead such a lifestyle. The impact of lifestyle on diabetes cannot be under-estimated and the theme in 2000 was the occasion to re-address this issue.

World Diabetes Day 2001: diabetes and cardiovascular disease

Reducing the Burden: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease was the theme of World Diabetes Day this year, celebrated on 14 November, a date that has become central to the whole diabetes world. The date was chosen several years ago to commemorate the birth of Frederick Banting, the first who conceived the idea which lead to the discovery of insulin in 1921.

Thinking global, acting local: World Diabetes Day 2001

All around the world on 14 November 2001, untold numbers of healthcare professionals, pharmacists, decision makers, and people with diabetes and their friends and families celebrated World Diabetes Day (WDD). Millions of people worldwide received the message that diabetes is now reaching epidemic proportions. Looking through the numerous reports and pictures we have received at the IDF Executive Office in Brussels, it is obvious that in just over a decade 14 November has become singularly the most important day of the year for raising global awareness about diabetes-related issues.

Preventing blindness online

Individuals with diabetes are 25 to 30 times more likely to lose their sight from diabetic eye damage (retinopathy), cataracts or glaucoma. The US National Eye Institute reports that almost half of the 16 million people with diabetes in America have at least early signs of diabetic retinopathy. Nearly 700,000 people have serious retinal disease, and as many as 25,000 people go blind from diabetic retinopathy. In light of these statistics, Prevent Blindness America (PBA), the oldest volunteer eye health organization in the United States, has launched a new website, www.diabetes-sight.org.

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: double jeopardy

Diabetes is closely associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), particularly heart attack, stroke and ischaemia of the lower limbs. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop these diseases compared to people without the condition. Recent evidence, however, tells us that it is possible to prevent or delay these complications. IDF is very aware of the scale of the problem, and has entered the 21st century with the issue high on its agenda. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease has been selected as the theme for this year’s World Diabetes Day campaign.

World Diabetes Day 2002: a bird's-eye view

This year the WDD theme of diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) played a more prominent role in the publicity surrounding WDD events than has been the case for previous themes. Diabetes is the world's primary cause of damage to vision and blindness. One of the specific objectives of WDD 2002 was to warn of the threat of irreversible retinopathy posed by the condition. The theme was taken up in order to campaign for improved provision of sight checks as a relatively low-cost method of prevention.

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