Metabolic syndrome

English

Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases: a serious link

The metabolic syndrome is becoming a global public health issue. Those affected have higher risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke – as well as of dying from such an event – compared with people without the syndrome. This cluster of factors is closely linked with the worldwide increases in type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases. The resulting premature deaths and disabilities are set to cripple health budgets in both developed and developing countries. Criteria for diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome entail a combination of cardio-metabolic risk factors.

The metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents: the IDF consensus

The importance of identifying children who are at risk of developing the metabolic syndrome cannot be underestimated. The syndrome is a cluster of risk factors

Insensitivity to insulin and obesity: the underlying cause

In the late 20th century obesity became an epidemic. The importance of obesity as a risk factor for a number of conditions, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, gallstones and certain cancers, is well documented. Often associated with insensitivity to insulin, obesity is clearly a key factor in the development of the metabolic syndrome – a risk for both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this article, Robert Eckel and Scott Grundy explore the underlying causes of obesity and insensitivity to insulin.

Obesity and the metabolic syndrome in young people

As the number of children with obesity continues to grow, the health implications of the condition are becoming increasingly evident: an unprecedented epidemic of type 2 diabetes is emerging in obese and overweight young people. At the time of diagnosis of diabetes, cardiovascular disease may already be present, even in young adults. The close association between type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease led to the hypothesis that the two may arise from a common antecedent, the metabolic syndrome – a cluster of metabolic disorders.

Metabolic syndrome, pregnancy and the risk of cardiovascular disease

While a proportion of women with the metabolic syndrome become pregnant, pregnancy itself creates a milieu that is similar to the syndrome, including the development in some women of insulin insensitivity and increased levels of blood

Treating the syndrome today and in the future

We can take advantage of the metabolic syndrome: it can be used as a simple and effective tool to assess health risks in people with type 2 diabetes and those without the condition. We can benefit from the universal availability of the tools needed to make a diagnosis – at no further cost. Given the excessive levels of death and disability suffered by people with type 2 diabetes and its associated conditions, it is of the utmost importance that early and appropriate steps are taken once a diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is made. Fortunately, there

Diabetes, the metabolic syndrome and the epidemic of cardiovascular disease

Over the last 30 to 40 years, the death rate from cardiovascular disease has been gradually falling in many countries in the developed world. Improved detection and treatment of high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels, falling rates of smoking, and modern, efficient treatment of emergencies, such as heart attacks, have contributed to a steady decline in the numbers of people dying from cardiovascular conditions. However, according to Jonathan Shaw, this trend could be reversed at the next tick of the global clock.

The metabolic syndrome: genetics, lifestyle and ethnicity

Over a few million years, human genes gradually evolved, enabling us to survive frequent periods of famine. Our genes are still essentially the same; but we are currently exposed to lifestyles for which we are not programmed. We were

The metabolic syndrome: an Asian perspective

In the global epidemic of diabetes and obesity, Asia is being hit the hardest. Each year, 17 million people die from stroke and heart disease worldwide. Of these deaths, 11 million will occur in developing regions, including Asia. Approximately

The metabolic syndrome in developing countries

The occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in various ethnic groups – including Caucasians, Africans, Latin Americans, Asian Indians, Chinese, Aboriginal Australians, Polynesians and Micronesians – has been confirmed in

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