Diabetes treatment

English

Understanding the psychological barriers to effective diabetes therapy

In order to minimize the risk of diabetes complications, effective therapy for people with Type 2 diabetes involves lifestyle changes and poly-pharmacy targeting levels of blood glucose, blood pressure and blood fat. However, the strict targets set in recent guidelines are seldom achieved by the majority of people with diabetes. Barriers to effective diabetes therapy have been identified within the organization of health care and in the interaction between health-care providers and people with

The other global fuel crisis

President's editorial

Psychological insulin resistance: what do patients and providers fear most?

If insulin is such an effective drug, why are so many people with type 2 diabetes reluctant to take it, and sometimes really apprehensive, despite acknowledged poor outcomes on diet and oral blood glucose lowering agents? Are healthcare providers part of the problem? Is there such syndrome as Insulin Resistance (PIR)? For a better understanding of PIR, which is commonly observed as a problem in type 2 diabetes, we need to look beyond the demonstrated efficacy of insulin, and understand people’s beliefs, emotions and concerns regarding insulin treatment.

Lessons from the history of insulin

I recently had the enormous honour to unveil a large bronze statue of Nicolae Paulescu in Bucharest together with the President of Romania. The occasion was the 80th anniversary of the publication of Paulescu’s seminal paper on his discovery of insulin…

Complementary therapies

'Complementary therapies' have been in use for thousands of years. Today they are increasingly popular with the general public and many health professionals, especially nurses and general practitioners. Despite the wide availability of conventional medications, over 50% of the populations of most Western countries use complementary therapies. This figure may be even higher in other cultures. Many complementary therapies can be used by people with diabetes, but there are associated risks that need to be considered.

The people at the centre of care

President's editorial

Combined study reveals gaps in diabetes therapy

Care of people with diabetes is in need of improvement. Patients are often left in the dark about their condition and many receive false or unnecessary medication. It has been shown in a recent German study, performed by the Centre for Sociopolitics at the University of Bremen, together with the medical insurance company, Gmünder Ersatzkasse (GEK), that too few people with diabetes are being subscribed much needed medication, too many are taking the wrong type of medication and many are inadequately informed about sensible diet and self-management techniques.

Can we prevent diabetes?

President's editorial

Dedicated mothers: managing diabetes during pregnancy

Today, the chances of a successful pregnancy in a woman with diabetes are close to those of a woman without diabetes, providing diabetes and obstetric care is optimal. In other words, if a woman is able to look after her health, then in most cases diabetes should not prevent her from having a healthy baby.

Going down: lipids and all that cholesterol

Diabetes prevention takes many forms. Other articles in this issue of Diabetes Voice describe primary prevention of Type 2 diabetes (the diabetes of obesity and Western lifestyles), while secondary prevention is the use of lifestyle

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