Diabetes treatment

English

Drug development and diabetes: can we ensure an open environment for their data?

The development of new drugs might contribute to the defeat of some diseases, including diabetes, for which no cure has yet been found. New drugs are necessary and very welcome, provided that they are launched on the market following thorough, reliable and independent clinical evaluation of their safety and effectiveness. This article digs into this issue, providing an example of the repercussions that market pressures and inadequate clinical reporting have had in the lives of people with diabetes.

Diabetes and kidney disease: a report from NephroAsia 2004

The global burden of chronic kidney failure (end stage renal disease) is primarily driven by the current parallel rise in the prevalence of diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension). Asia, which has more than 60% of the world’s population, is at the forefront of this global epidemic of diabetes and kidney disease. Juliana Chan offers some background on the current status of care for kidney disease and reports on the NephroAsia 2004 meeting in Singapore.

Poverty versus genes: the social context of Type 2 diabetes

Together with its 'twin sister', childhood obesity, Type 2 diabetes is spreading among young people around the world. This constitutes a serious public health problem; by their 30s, generations of young people will have been living with Type 2

Glucagon-like peptide 1: new therapies for Type 2 diabetes

We usually assume that the ups and downs of blood glucose are solely responsible for changes in the release of insulin into the circulation, such as in response to a meal. However, the release of insulin from the pancreas is supported by signals from the alimentary canal (gut). When food is transported from the stomach into the small intestine, from which glucose, fat and proteins are absorbed into the blood, gut hormones are released into the circulation. Around 50%

Improved diabetes management in South Africa: the case for a capitation model

About 43 million people live in the Republic of South Africa. Approximately 80% of these receive government-sponsored medical care, and 20% receive medical care in the private sector – paid for either by themselves or by medical insurance schemes. The costs of diabetes management are considerable, both for the person with the condition and the health-care provider. These costs relate to the management of the condition and the treatment of short- and long-term diabetes

Double transplant: a diabetologist's return from diabetes

When she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 12 years, Silvia Iancu began a long and at times frightening voyage through care. At the time, she lived with her family under the constraints of the difficult regime in Romania; her parents' reaction to the diagnosis was one of fear and desperation. Given the hardships of life under the dictatorship, her parents did not know whether they would be able to provide the insulin and other diabetes supplies that Silvia would need to survive the condition.

Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA)

Diabetes is classified into two major types: Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, and Type 2 diabetes. However, it is apparent that there are some forms of the condition which do not fit comfortably into these categories. Indeed, there is one form of diabetes which appears to straddle the two major types. While it appears to affect adults with Type 2 diabetes, it shows many of the genetic, immune, and metabolic features of Type 1 diabetes, and carries a high risk of progression to insulin dependency. This form of the condition is known as 'latent autoimmune diabetes in adults' (LADA).

The very centre of care

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

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