Diabetes treatment

English

Guideline for the management of post-meal blood glucose

Diabetes is a leading cause of death in most developed countries, and has become a serious epidemic in many developing and newly industrialized nations. Currently, an estimated 246 million people worldwide have diabetes. Poorly controlled diabetes is associated with disabling and potentially life-threatening complications such as eye disease, kidney disease, nerve damage and cardiovascular disease. Until recently, lowering fasting and pre-meal glucose levels was a key focus of diabetes management.

Translating science into practice: the US National Diabetes Education Program

The USA ranks third in the global prevalence of diabetes, preceded only by India and China. About 7% of the population has diabetes. A third of the total number of people with the condition is believed to be undiagnosed and therefore not receiving treatment to reduce the risk of disabling and life-threatening diabetes complications. The economic costs of diabetes are enormous – estimated at 132 billion USD in 2002. The mission of the US National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is to reduce diabetes-related illness and death.

Managing diabetes during Ramadan

Fasting during Ramadan, one of the five pillars of Islam, is an obligatory duty for all healthy adult Muslims. Ramadan, a lunar month, can last for 29 or 30 days, and its timing changes with respect to seasons. Depending on the geographical location

The BD commitment: diabetes education for all


Education and public information: preventing diabetic ketoacidosis in Italy

Left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis has a 100% death rate. Indeed, ketoacidosis is a leading cause of death and disability in children with type 1 diabetes. Severe acidosis often develops during an extended period in which hyperglycaemia-related symptoms are misdiagnosed. Reducing this period may be sufficient to prevent severe acidosis in newly diagnosed children with diabetes.

The challenge of adolescence: hormonal changes and sensitivity to insulin

Puberty is a period of rapid and radical physical, psychological and social change during which a child, in physiological terms, becomes an adult capable of reproduction. Adolescence refers as much to the psychosocial characteristics of development during puberty as to the physical changes. Adolescents with diabetes, who need to adhere to a complex medical regimen based around self-care throughout this period of development, face a series of particular and considerable challenges.

No more nightmares: treatments to prevent nocturnal hypoglycaemia in children

For many young people and their parents, nocturnal hypoglycaemia is perhaps the most feared short-term complication of diabetes. Intensive diabetes control is beneficial for all people with the condition – maintaining good blood glucose control overnight is critical in reducing the body’s exposure to high glucose levels. But it increases the risk of a dangerous drop in blood glucose levels while people are asleep. David Dunger and Roman Hovorka describe the problem of nocturnal hypoglycaemia and look forward to future developments that might reduce and eventually eradicate the risks.

What is so different about diabetes in children?

While both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can occur in children and adolescents, the overwhelming majority of people affected by diabetes worldwide are adults. Consequently, the specific needs of children are often overlooked. Type 1 diabetes, the most common chronic disease in children in developed countries, is growing by 5% among pre-school children and by 3% in children and adolescents each year – 70 000 new cases every year in children aged 14 years and younger worldwide.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

Striving for comprehensive diabetes care in Uzbekistan

As the number of people with diabetes continues to rise worldwide, huge increases in the prevalence of the condition are expected in Asia. Hospital and outpatient care for people with diabetes in the central Asian Republic of Uzbekistan, with a population of over 26 million people, is provided at state-funded healthcare centres. However, people with the condition have to pay for their insulin and other essential diabetes supplies out of their family income. Diabetes-

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