Diabetes treatment

English

No more nightmares: treatments to prevent nocturnal hypoglycaemia in children

For many young people and their parents, nocturnal hypoglycaemia is perhaps the most feared short-term complication of diabetes. Intensive diabetes control is beneficial for all people with the condition – maintaining good blood glucose control overnight is critical in reducing the body’s exposure to high glucose levels. But it increases the risk of a dangerous drop in blood glucose levels while people are asleep. David Dunger and Roman Hovorka describe the problem of nocturnal hypoglycaemia and look forward to future developments that might reduce and eventually eradicate the risks.

What is so different about diabetes in children?

While both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can occur in children and adolescents, the overwhelming majority of people affected by diabetes worldwide are adults. Consequently, the specific needs of children are often overlooked. Type 1 diabetes, the most common chronic disease in children in developed countries, is growing by 5% among pre-school children and by 3% in children and adolescents each year – 70 000 new cases every year in children aged 14 years and younger worldwide.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

Striving for comprehensive diabetes care in Uzbekistan

As the number of people with diabetes continues to rise worldwide, huge increases in the prevalence of the condition are expected in Asia. Hospital and outpatient care for people with diabetes in the central Asian Republic of Uzbekistan, with a population of over 26 million people, is provided at state-funded healthcare centres. However, people with the condition have to pay for their insulin and other essential diabetes supplies out of their family income. Diabetes-

An EU Declaration on diabetes: hopes and expectations

As early as 1989, the St Vincent Declaration warned Europeans of the dangers of ignoring the burgeoning diabetes epidemic. The Declaration called on governments, diabetes organizations and professional societies from countries throughout Europe to unite in efforts to tackle the growing challenge to healthcare in the region. There were high hopes among the European diabetes community that significant action would be taken. But despite the broad stakeholder support for the Declaration’s objectives, significant progress failed to materialize.

The Healthy Beverage Guidelines: a tool to fight obesity

The Beverage Guidance Panel was assembled to provide guidance on the relative benefits and risks for health of various categories of drink. Initiated by the first author of this article, the Panel’s purpose was to attempt to systematically review the literature on beverages and health, and provide guidance to consumers; and to develop a deeper dialogue among the scientific community on beverage consumption patterns. The Panel aimed also to highlight the great potential of changing these as a way to improve health.

An overview of non-medical prescribing: past, present and future

The move towards non-medical prescribing is a process that has evolved over the past 20 years. But some diabetes healthcare professionals continue to question its benefits. In this article, June James looks at the challenges surrounding non-medical prescribing and describes the training required for effective prescribing. The author focuses mainly on work undertaken in the UK but also explores non-medical prescribing in other countries, and the potential impact this might have on diabetes care worldwide.

Polycystic ovary syndrome and women with diabetes

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder to affect women of reproductive age. Although it was first described almost 70 years ago, there has been no universal agreement about its definition. Eleni Kousta and Stephen Franks describe the prevalence, symptoms, and cause of PCOS, and look at long-term health implications and the available and possible future treatments for women with the syndrome.

Against the odds: overcoming diabetes in Patagonia

When I met Sonia Carrasco, 14 years ago, she was suffering from diabetes ketoacidosis – extremely high glucose levels, a sign of poorly controlled diabetes. Although she had been living with the condition for about 6 years, her diabetes knowledge was minimal, reflecting a general lack of health awareness. When I asked Sonia to describe her feelings the day she was given a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, 20 years before, she recalls an experience made all the more terrifying by an acute fear of the unknown. She had understood that she had leukaemia.

Waking up to diabetes in Papua New Guinea - Jacklyin's story

My daughter Jacklyin was born in January 1990, three months premature. Her early birth gave her unusual status among her family and the rest of the community in our village, Gumine – in the Province of Chimbu, in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. She would always be given our special protection and ate the best of all children in the village.

Pages