Diabetes treatment

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Achieving excellence in diabetes foot care: one step at a time

By the time you finish reading this paragraph, it is likely that at least one person has lost part of a foot or leg through diabetic foot disease. This happens every 30 seconds. An amputation is often preceded by an ulcer; 15% of people with diabetes are affected by a foot ulcer at some time in their life. With the global diabetes population set to rise to 333 million by 2025, there is an urgent need for a co-ordinated preventive clinical response to reduce the impact of the diabetic foot.

Diabetes in people with HIV

It is estimated that over 39 million people worldwide are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The introduction of protease inhibitors as part of the anti-HIV therapy has contributed to a huge reduction in the number of people who die from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, the use of these drugs has been associated with new-onset diabetes; recent studies have

Blood glucose levels after meals: all important?

While it is known that people with diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the factors which contribute to this state are not fully understood. In this article, Antonio Ceriello examines the importance of the post-meal functioning of the body in the development of heart disease.

Diabetes after transplantation: revised guidelines target early treatment

People who have a kidney, liver or heart transplant are at high risk of developing diabetes. This can lead to cardiovascular disease and the rejection of the transplant. Factors such as age, weight and family history can increase the risk of new-onset diabetes after transplantation. Importantly, drugs that suppress the immune system and prevent transplant rejection also play a key role. In December 2003, an international panel of experts in transplantation and diabetes met to update the existing guidelines for the management of new-onset diabetes after

Essential diabetes care: the prevention of fracture risk

Assessing the health of people’s bones should be a standard component of diabetes care. People with diabetes are at an increased risk for fractures; this risk increases with the development of diabetes complications. Bone fractures impose a major impact on a person’s quality of life and on healthcare budgets. Inge Van Pottelbergh explains bone loss in people with diabetes and looks at the current treatment options.

The year of the diabetic foot

The human and economic consequences of the diabetic foot are extreme. Due to various complications of diabetes, a person’s foot can become vulnerable. Nerve

Foods and their effects on blood sugar

Until the discovery of insulin in the 1920’s, dietary modification offered the only means of reducing raised blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Now a wide variety of sophisticated insulin regimes are available; and for people with Type 2 diabetes, there is a range of oral medication. However, there is increasing appreciation that appropriate food selection remains a cornerstone of diabetes management. While it is important to remember that the way in which

The history of diabetes nutrition therapy: from starvation to evidence-based recommendations

“For forty-eight hours after admission to the hospital the patient is kept on an ordinary diet, to determine the severity of his diabetes. Then he is starved, and no food allowed save whiskey and black coffee. The whiskey is given in the coffee: 1 ounce of whiskey every two hours, from 7am until 7pm. The whiskey is not an essential part of treatment; it merely furnishes a few calories and keeps the patient more comfortable while he is being starved.” Starvation (Allen) Treatment of Diabetes (1915).

Meal-time blood sugar control in pregnancy

We have known for more than half a century that good control of blood sugar (glucose) is important for the normal development of the unborn baby throughout pregnancy. During those years there has been much progress in advising

Designer insulins and meal-time blood glucose control

After the discovery of insulin in the 1920´s, available insulin was from natural sources (animal pancreas) until human insulin was made available in the early 1980s. None of these insulins was ideal for injection under the skin. Now, new

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