Nutrition

English

45 years of improving care in Japan

2002 marked the 45th anniversary of the Japan Diabetes Society. The Society carries out diverse activities in support of basic and clinical research into diabetes, which is a major health burden in Japan. Indeed, recent research indicates that the Japanese are more likely than Europeans to develop Type 2 diabetes. Today there are 6.9 million people with diabetes in Japan. It is predicted that, if current lifestyle habits remain unchanged, there will be 10.8 million people with diabetes in the country by the year 2010.

The challenge to movers and shakers: broad strategies to prevent obesity and diabetes

We know that in both Western and Asian adults in the vulnerable overweight groups with impaired glucose tolerance, modest weight loss with specific changes in diet and physical activity can reduce the likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes. Marked weight loss in severely obese people with diabetes can also ameliorate the risks from their diabetes perhaps for a decade or more. However, clinical interventions to achieve this require intensive personal supervision, which,

Japanese school programmes combat type 2 diabetes

So-called 'late onset diabetes' is now more widely termed Type 2 diabetes. And for very good reasons. It was previously the case that childhood and adolescent diabetes was nearly exclusively Type 1 diabetes and that Type 2 diabetes very rarely affected the young. Sadly, this is no longer true. As the spread of 'westernized' lifestyles gives rise to a steep increase in rates of obesity worldwide, Type 2 diabetes is rapidly emerging among children and adolescents.

Fighting fat: with TAF in Singapore

In 1992, the Singapore government noted that the obesity prevalence among schoolchildren was 14%. Singapore's population has a relatively high prevalence of diabetes, at 9.2%. Rates of obesity and overweight are high – 6% of the adult population has a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2, and around 25% have a BMI above 25 kg/m2. Recent years have also seen the increasing appearance of young onset Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose

The changing face of diabetes: medical nutrition therapy

Previously disregarded due to the lack of strong clinical evidence supporting its effectiveness in the treatment of diabetes, the role of medical nutrition therapy has recently changed. This is all the more important given the link between diabetes and obesity, and the steady increase of the latter at a global level, particularly in the industrializing countries. So today, when advising on how to best manage the condition, diabetes healthcare teams are putting more and more emphasis on healthy lifestyles, of which nutrition is a major component.

Globesity: a crisis of growing proportions

In the United States, the latest data show that two out of three adults are overweight, and nearly one in three is obese. Alarmingly, similar trends are emerging around the world. In countries as diverse as the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Kuwait, and Mexico at least half the population is overweight and one in five is obese.

Obesity, diabetes, and the child

This article by Martin Silink explains why children are becoming obese. He describes the scope of the obesity epidemic and explains how this is thought to be linked to diabetes. He investigates the causes of unhealthy eating habits and the decline in physical activity, and shows how these are impacting on the health of the world's children.

Nuts! their health benefits

Although rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are declining in many developed countries, it remains the number one cause of death. In developing countries, CVD rates are increasing. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop CVD than people without diabetes. The prevention and treatment of CVD by diet is an important issue both for persons with diabetes and those without. Dr Alexandra Chisholm explains the benefits of eating nuts as part of a healthy balanced diet.

Prevention of diabetes throughout an obesogenic world

Overweight is an important risk factor for noncommunicable diseases in general and diabetes in particular. There is presently a global epidemic of overweight. A recent large study found a 5.6% growth in obesity in the United States in 2001, and a massive 74% increase since 1991. Twenty one percent of American adults are obese. The prevalence of diabetes, which correlates with obesity has risen 61% in the US since 1990. Diabetes rose 8% over 2000-01 to nearly 8% of the population. The situation is not much better in many developing countries.

Food power: a vegetarian approach to diabetes

Recent research has demonstrated the health benefits of diet and exercise for people with diabetes. The positive results offer an optimistic future to millions of people with the condition, and the many millions more who are at risk from diabetes around the world. We now know that therapeutic lifestyle interventions are highly effective in both preventing and managing the condition. In people with Type 2 diabetes, lifestyle changes can reduce and even eliminate the need for

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