Patient-centred care

English

Health coaching increases self-esteem and healthy smiles

Promoting oral health is essential in order to prevent and reduce the negative consequences of type 2 diabetes and to maintain good health.1 Tragically, periodontal disease significantly contributes to the risk of dying from diabetes.

DAWN2 study highlights importance of active involvement, engagement and education of people with diabetes

Self-management support and diabetes education is essential for people with diabetes to actively engage in effective diabetes self-management. People with diabetes who feel capable of self-managing their diabetes have the opportunity to live better lives with diabetes, get more support and to better utilize the health care system.

 


DAWN2 study results: provision of quality team-based and individualized diabetes care

Modern diabetes care demands the comprehensive knowledge of multiple medical, nursing and paramedical specialties and is ideally delivered by a coordinated team of experts. This care should be provided in an individualized or person-centred manner to improve its acceptability as well as its effectiveness. Diabetes care is constantly evolving, hopefully for the better.

In the spirit of patient centeredness


Angus Forbes

Are the latest treatment innovations enough for people living with diabetes in the 21st century? How can the medical profession utilise current technologies and treatment innovations without losing touch with patient values and the power of compassion and insight?

Taking the benefits of DAFNE to the UK and beyond

Two English diabetologists were among an international audience while Michael Berger told it to throw away the diet from the therapeutic approach

D-START: supporting innovative translational research projects in developing countries

In the three years since its inception and after two initial rounds of funding, the International Diabetes Federation’s BRIDGES programme has become one of the principal funding initiatives in diabetes worldwide. With the recent announcement of its third round of funding, BRIDGES has consolidated its position in the fast-developing and innovative sector of translational research.

Inpatient care for people with diabetes - bringing good practice into hospital

People with diabetes occupy a significant proportion of hospital beds – about 10% in the UK, although this may be an underestimate. While diabetes specialists are often based in a hospital, the majority of people with diabetes who are admitted to hospital – at a time when their diabetes might be difficult to control – do not actually meet the diabetes team.

Preparing a global healthcare workforce for the challenge of chronic conditions

Chronic conditions are increasing. The number of people affected by chronic non-communicable conditions, including diabetes and heart disease, is growing worldwide. Collectively, chronic conditions were responsible for 35 million – a full 60% – of all deaths in 2005. This is twice the number of deaths due to infectious diseases, poor maternal health and malnutrition combined. In addition to causing high death rates, chronic conditions account for almost half of the world’s disability.

The effects of diabetes on depression and depression on diabetes

Diabetes can have both a daily and long-term impact on people with the condition – both physically and in terms of its psychosocial effects. It is now known that people with diabetes are at a substantially increased risk of experiencing mental distress, particularly depression. Furthermore, a growing bank of evidence points to a two-way relationship between the conditions. Yet depression is often under-diagnosed in people with diabetes.

Managing chronic disease as a team - new models of care delivery

As the world’s population ages, the impact of chronic diseases will drive health systems around the world in two ways – adding significantly to the cost, and imposing considerable constraints on the already strained healthcare workforce. It is estimated that the health budgets of most developed nations will consume 20% of their gross domestic product by the 2020s. The most recent World Health Organization Health Workforce Report suggests shortfalls of some 4.3 million healthcare workers over the next decade – including nurses, doctors and health administrators.

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