Patient-centred care

English

Variations in risk perception: South Asians living in the UK and their healthcare professionals

Diabetes has become a global health problem, reaching epidemic proportions worldwide with serious implications for health and well-being. The International Diabetes Federation estimates that by 2025, almost 350 million people will have diabetes. People who are most vulnerable to this chronic disease include those living in developing countries, and members of minority ethnic groups and socio-economically disadvantaged people in developed countries.

An overview of non-medical prescribing: past, present and future

The move towards non-medical prescribing is a process that has evolved over the past 20 years. But some diabetes healthcare professionals continue to question its benefits. In this article, June James looks at the challenges surrounding non-medical prescribing and describes the training required for effective prescribing. The author focuses mainly on work undertaken in the UK but also explores non-medical prescribing in other countries, and the potential impact this might have on diabetes care worldwide.

Polycystic ovary syndrome and women with diabetes

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder to affect women of reproductive age. Although it was first described almost 70 years ago, there has been no universal agreement about its definition. Eleni Kousta and Stephen Franks describe the prevalence, symptoms, and cause of PCOS, and look at long-term health implications and the available and possible future treatments for women with the syndrome.

Patient education and psychological care

People with diabetes deliver most of their own care. This reflects the observation that diabetes and its associated features touch on most aspects of daily living, and aspects as fundamental as eating and physical activity. To deliver such care requires knowledge, but even with knowledge it may not be easy to adjust to optimal self-care. This makes patient education a complex therapeutic issue.

Outpatient and inpatient diabetes care delivery

Diabetes care is inherently complex – hence the need for 19 chapters of evidence review and recommendations in the Global Guideline. Pulling all the recommendations together to ensure the implementation of effective delivery of care therefore needs some organization of its own, as is discussed in this article. A special situation is that of people with diabetes in hospital, who are often subject to disruption of lifestyle due to illness, procedures, or surgery, with knock-on effects on their diabetes management.

National and regional organization: the key to effective diabetes care in Moscow

According to the federal statistics agency of the Russian Federation, the country’s population is in a phase of negative growth and currently stands at around 143 million. There are 2.3 million people registered with diabetes, 2 million of whom have type 2 diabetes. However, according to recent epidemiological research, there may be some 8 million people living with the condition in Russia. Success in addressing the problems relating to diabetes and its complications largely depends on the effective organization of diabetes care at regional and national levels.

From practice and research to large-scale implementation: the 3rd DAWN summit

The Diabetes Attitudes Wishes and Needs (DAWN) programme was launched in 2001 with the global DAWN study. Initiated by Novo Nordisk in partnership with the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and an international expert advisory board, the DAWN programme aims to respond to shortcomings in diabetes care; less than half of the people who are diagnosed with diabetes worldwide reach optimal health and quality of life. The 3rd DAWN summit, which was held recently in Florence, Italy, gathered 900 experts, people with diabetes, policy-makers

The role of IAPO in improving healthcare worldwide

The International Alliance of Patients’ Organizations (IAPO) is a global coalition of patient groups, representing people of all nationalities and across all disease areas, which promotes patient-centred healthcare. The members of IAPO are organizations that at the local, national, regional and international levels support patients and their families and carers. Emma Rigby describes the objectives, work and achievements of IAPO, and focuses on the promotion of patient-centred healthcare – a central aspect of the Alliance’s mission and

Diabetes care in Taiwan: a case-management initiative

Diabetes, now a global epidemic, is the fourth leading cause of death in Taiwan. The most recent epidemiological data demonstrated that the prevalence of diabetes is approaching 5% and that the number of people with diabetes in Taiwan

Preventing non-communicable diseases: an integrated community approach

The drastic rise in childhood obesity worldwide reflects the impact of unhealthy modern lifestyles. Over the last decade and a half, the increase of high-sugar, high-fat processed foods in our diets has combined with sedentary behaviour to radically and negatively affect the health of our societies. Initiatives are urgently required which can reduce the resulting individual and societal burden to physical and psychological health and economic development.

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