Patient-centred care

English

Comprehensive care in a low-income country: the Ghana experience

In the 1950s and 1960s diabetes prevalence in Ghana was estimated at between 0.2% and 0.4% in adults. However, a recent analysis of admissions to the largest hospital in the country reveals that diabetes accounts for 6.8% of all adult admissions. Despite the fact that diabetes is clearly a major health problem in Ghana, the country has no separate diabetes healthcare policy. To address these issues, a three-year national programme, the Ghana Diabetes Programme, was initiated in 1995.

Setting the standards in England

In England we are currently increasing public spending on health faster than any major country in Europe. But, along with investing more, we need to do things differently. We need to look more radically at how health services are provided within a network of health and social care, shifting the balance between what we do in hospitals and what we do elsewhere. These are the principles that we will apply to modernizing diabetes treatment and that will underpin the ongoing work of the National Service Frameworks (NSF).

A world-wide call to action

The scale of the problem that diabetes poses to world health is still widely under-recognized. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that if current trends continue, the number of people with diabetes will almost double; from 194 million people in 2003 to 333 million by the year 2025. Diabetes is already the most costly health-care problem in the westernized and 'westernizing' countries.

It is all about the people

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

The people at the centre of care

President's editorial

Combined study reveals gaps in diabetes therapy

Care of people with diabetes is in need of improvement. Patients are often left in the dark about their condition and many receive false or unnecessary medication. It has been shown in a recent German study, performed by the Centre for Sociopolitics at the University of Bremen, together with the medical insurance company, Gmünder Ersatzkasse (GEK), that too few people with diabetes are being subscribed much needed medication, too many are taking the wrong type of medication and many are inadequately informed about sensible diet and self-management techniques.

New roles in diabetes care

Empowerment is a philosophy that recognizes the fundamental right of people with diabetes to be the primary decision makers in the management of their condition. It represents a more compatible model of care and education needed for a self-managed illness such as diabetes.

Empowerment: a matter of choice

There has been an enormous change over the last 30 years in diabetes care and education in Germany and most of Western Europe. Nowadays, feelings of frustration have decreased for both healthcare professionals and people with diabetes, as it is finally becoming recognized just who is responsible for what.

A Canterbury tale: this is your life, Don Beaven

Some people have ideas; others seem driven to put them into effect. In Christchurch, New Zealand, over the last 50 years, Don Beaven has pioneered diabetes associations, diabetes centres, diabetes promotion, and diabetes guidelines, not to mention wine and olive growing. The local diabetes association, Diabetes Christchurch, recently held a 'This is Your Life' celebration of his activities and successes – Elizabeth Home reports.

Staged Diabetes Management: improving diabetes care worldwide

Diabetes and the disorders associated with diabetes currently affect one billion people world wide. Surprisingly, specialists care for less than 2% of people with diabetes and its related disorders. General practitioners constitute the principal care providers for almost all of these people. The majority of these health professionals serve in an environment with very limited resources. Nevertheless, within such health-care systems, these resources can be optimized, and evidence-based medicine can be practised. Roger S Mazze reports on the potential improvements to

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