Type 2 diabetes


Education to change the course of diabetes in the Caribbean

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that over 382 million people currently live with diabetes globally. This accounts for 11% of the adult population and is projected to increase to near 592 million by 2035. The data reveals that over 80% of persons living with diabetes are from developing countries.

Health coaching increases self-esteem and healthy smiles

Promoting oral health is essential in order to prevent and reduce the negative consequences of type 2 diabetes and to maintain good health.1 Tragically, periodontal disease significantly contributes to the risk of dying from diabetes.

Education helps decision-making for affordable, healthy food and control

Barriers to successful diabetes self-management in low-income populations include reduced access to healthy food along with limited awareness of healthy eating. In the United States, it is a public health paradox that those at the highest risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes are the most food insecure, meaning unable to consistently afford or have access to enough healthy food to meet their nutritional needs.1

Can a peer support intervention improve type 2 diabetes outcomes?

Several kinds of battle

Several different battles are illustrated by the contents of this Issue of Diabetes Voice. The first of these is the battle individuals face to maintain any kind of diabetes self-care in the wake of cataclysmic natural disasters – hurricanes, typhoons, inundations, earthquakes, forest fires or whatever form these disasters may take.

Taking big steps - a look back at World Diabetes Day 2013

Diabetes care in Rwanda - against all odds


Report on the World Diabetes Congress 2013 Melbourne


Testing the limits - the double burden of diabetes and disaster


Debate - the long-term safety of insulin in type 2 diabetes

More and more frequently insulin is being recommended as an ‘add-on’ to oral hypoglycaemic therapy for the achievement of blood glucose targets in people with established type 2 diabetes. Indeed, there are now trials of insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes from diagnosis. Concerns have been raised in the recent medical literature that long-term insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers. We have asked specialists in the fields of clinical diabetes and pharmacoepidemiology to comment on the question: