Type 2 diabetes

English

Type 2 diabetes, the challenge of prevention and the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health

There are huge disparities in the risk of death and disease across the world, with life expectancy at birth ranging from greater than 80 years in Japan and Sweden, to less than 50 years in many African countries. Disparities also exist within countries and, irrespective of a country’s overall wealth, overall risk of disease and death tend to be strongly related to socioeconomic position, with the worse health in the less well off.

Obstructive sleep apnoea and type 2 diabetes - the IDF consensus

Recent years have seen an expansion in the number of conditions that are recognized as having a link with diabetes. In people with sleep apnoea breathing stops briefly but repeatedly during sleep. It is commonly associated with obesity, and therefore frequently occurs in people with type 2 diabetes. However, recent research demonstrates the likelihood of a relationship between obstructive sleep apnoea and diabetes that is independent of obesity. The links between the conditions are particularly important as both increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The IMAGE project - preventing type 2 diabetes in Europe

The standards for diabetes prevention vary greatly between the EU Member States. By sharing best practices and raising standards in the prevention of type 2 diabetes throughout the EU, the development of the condition in those at risk can be reduced. Major studies have demonstrated that prevention programmes can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Based on convincing evidence from clinical studies, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) have published recommendations for the prevention of the condition.

The genetics of type 2 diabetes - a look at the scientific advances of the DGDG project

The International Diabetes Federation estimates that approximately 246 million people around the world have diabetes. Of this number, around 90% are people with type 2 diabetes. The consequences for public health worldwide are devastating. The World Health Organization estimates that one in 20 deaths in the world is caused by diabetes, and that up to 15% of the annual budget for healthcare is devoted to the disease.

Family-centred education for migrants with diabetes in Scotland

A culturally sensitive, intensive diabetes education service is being delivered in the community to people of ethnic-minority origin living with type 2 diabetes in Lothian, Scotland. Designed by a pharmacist, the initiative began as a research project, but the effectiveness and popularity of the programme resulted in its development and implementation as part of the local diabetes care package.

Redesigning the urban environment to promote physical activity in Southern India

Type 2 diabetes has become the most common metabolic disorder. Its prevalence is growing most rapidly among people in the developing world, primarily due to the rapid demographic and epidemiological changes in these regions. According to IDF, India currently leads the world with an estimated 41 million people with diabetes; this figure is predicted to increase to 66 million by 2025. The diabetes epidemic is more pronounced in urban areas in India, where rates of diabetes are roughly double those in rural areas.

Convivencias: a low-cost model for holistic diabetes education

The objective of holiday camps for children and adolescents with diabetes is to create an environment in which they can learn to embrace their condition and its treatment. Achieving and maintaining good blood glucose control is a key aim; the camps provide excellent opportunities for young people to learn and practise diabetes skills and become familiar with the latest techniques.

The IDF consensus on the prevention of type 2 diabetes

Early intervention to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes benefits people who are at high risk of developing the condition in terms of increased life expectancy and quality of life. It also benefits societies and healthcare systems in economic terms. In order to address the growing impact of type 2 diabetes, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Task Force on Prevention and Epidemiology convened a consensus workshop in 2006. Its primary goal was the prevention of type 2 diabetes in developed and developing countries.

The impact of a low-fat vegan diet on people with type 2 diabetes

Typical diets for people with type 2 diabetes limit carbohydrates, reduce calories to facilitate weight loss, and limit saturated fats to reduce cardiovascular risk. These dietary changes are logical and sometimes helpful. For many people, however, this sort of change leads to no more than modest weight loss and a small improvement in blood glucose control. In this article, Neal Barnard looks at evidence to suggest there might be a more effective nutritional approach to prevent or manage type 2 diabetes.

Lifestyles hold the key to global health

President's editorial

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