Type 2 diabetes


The IDF consensus on the prevention of type 2 diabetes

Early intervention to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes benefits people who are at high risk of developing the condition in terms of increased life expectancy and quality of life. It also benefits societies and healthcare systems in economic terms. In order to address the growing impact of type 2 diabetes, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Task Force on Prevention and Epidemiology convened a consensus workshop in 2006. Its primary goal was the prevention of type 2 diabetes in developed and developing countries.

The impact of a low-fat vegan diet on people with type 2 diabetes

Typical diets for people with type 2 diabetes limit carbohydrates, reduce calories to facilitate weight loss, and limit saturated fats to reduce cardiovascular risk. These dietary changes are logical and sometimes helpful. For many people, however, this sort of change leads to no more than modest weight loss and a small improvement in blood glucose control. In this article, Neal Barnard looks at evidence to suggest there might be a more effective nutritional approach to prevent or manage type 2 diabetes.

Lifestyles hold the key to global health

President's editorial

Preventing type 2 diabetes in children - a role for the whole community

When the author began her career as a paediatric endocrinologist in Los Angeles, USA, 30 years ago, childhood obesity was rare and type 2 diabetes in young people was almost unheard of. Nowadays, however, one in three children in that city is overweight or obese, and a quarter of the children diagnosed with diabetes at her centre have type 2 diabetes. This situation mirrors developments in paediatric health throughout the world; obesity and type 2 diabetes in young people are now regarded as related global epidemics.

New data, fresh perspectives: Diabetes Atlas, Third Edition

The third edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched in December 2006, at the 19th World Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in Cape Town, South Africa. The aim of the Atlas, which has been described as the flagship publication of IDF, is to provide the most recent and accurate information on diabetes in 2007 and provide estimates of the likely impact of the condition up to 2025. Its purpose is to disseminate the most up-to-date and salient facts concerning the scope, impact and burden of diabetes globally and on a regional and country-by-country basis.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

Energy, motivation and commitment - the IDF Youth Ambassadors

In many countries, young people work effectively as advocates for a range of causes, from inner-city regeneration to anti-bullying and smoking cessation. An IDF initiative aimed to engage Youth Ambassadors in diabetes advocacy worldwide and specifically to participate at as many levels as possible in IDF’s global awareness campaign ’Unite For Diabetes’. In this article, representatives from the group describe the principles and objectives of the IDF Youth Ambassadors programme and make a call for increased involvement of young people in diabetes advocacy.

Variations in risk perception: South Asians living in the UK and their healthcare professionals

Diabetes has become a global health problem, reaching epidemic proportions worldwide with serious implications for health and well-being. The International Diabetes Federation estimates that by 2025, almost 350 million people will have diabetes. People who are most vulnerable to this chronic disease include those living in developing countries, and members of minority ethnic groups and socio-economically disadvantaged people in developed countries.

Striving for comprehensive diabetes care in Uzbekistan

As the number of people with diabetes continues to rise worldwide, huge increases in the prevalence of the condition are expected in Asia. Hospital and outpatient care for people with diabetes in the central Asian Republic of Uzbekistan, with a population of over 26 million people, is provided at state-funded healthcare centres. However, people with the condition have to pay for their insulin and other essential diabetes supplies out of their family income. Diabetes-

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