Gestational diabetes

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Reducing diabetes risk after gestational diabetes

Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes has been shown to be effective in many parts of the world. It has been years since important studies affirmed that preventative measures such as moderate weight loss, moderate physical activity and low-fat, high fibre food choices can help offset impaired glucose tolerance from progressing to a case of  type 2 diabetes.1,2

Everything you ever needed to know about gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is glucose intolerance that begins or is first identified during pregnancy.

Addressing the challenge of GDM in the developing world - perspectives from rural western Kenya

IDF Diabetes Atlas reveals high burden of hyperglycaemia in pregnancy

Hyperglycaemia is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders occurring during pregnancy. It can be a result of either existing diabetes in a pregnant woman or the development of insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia during pregnancy.

Hyperglycaemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) 2014 - fact, frustration and future needs

The concept of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or hyperglycaemia in pregnancy has long been recognised but is still the subject of much controversy.1 Many different screening protocols and clinical guidelines exist, but no international consensus, and even within countries there is considerable confusion as to what constitutes best practice.

Diabetes Voices - the power of learning for life

Gestational diabetes – an update from India

In recent decades, more women of a reproductive age have diabetes, and more pregnancies are complicated by pre-existing diabetes especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Also of concern is gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) - the type of diabetes that is first recognized during pregnancy and affects up to 15% of women worldwide.


Can shared care improve outcomes in women with gestational diabetes?

Gestational diabetes, which is defined as ‘any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy’, damages the health of millions of women and their babies during the perinatal period and later in life. Like type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes is on the rise worldwide. However, the management of gestational diabetes is less developed than the management of type 1 diabetes and 2 diabetes. In this report, Xilin Yang

Reproductive health in women with diabetes - the need for pre-conception care and education

Diabetes provokes a range of reproductive and sexual health problems: menstrual changes, fertility disorders, urinary and vaginal infections, urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Early diagnosis and treatment of these problems, with well-planned pre-conception care, can protect maternal and infant health. In this report, Seyda Ozcan and Nevin Sahin call for reproductive and sexual healthcare to be included in women’s diabetes management plan.

New findings in gestational diabetes - the HAPO Study

The diagnosis of gestational diabetes has for decades been based either on criteria that predict a mother’s risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the future, or those used for non-pregnant women. But gestational diabetes also carries a risk for the baby. Moreover, the level at which maternal blood glucose provokes risk for the foetus remains unclear.


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