National diabetes programmes

English

Diabetes care in Sudan: emerging issues and acute needs

Sudan is the largest country in Africa and one of the poorest in the world. Its population is estimated at around 37 million; the capital Khartoum, with approximately 6 million inhabitants, is growing rapidly. There are hundreds of ethnic and tribal divisions and language groups within the two distinct major cultures in Sudan – Arabs with Nubian roots and non-Arab Black Africans. The lack of effective collaboration among these groups continues to be a serious problem.

Towards a brighter future - harambe!

President's editorial

Diabetes care in Taiwan: a case-management initiative

Diabetes, now a global epidemic, is the fourth leading cause of death in Taiwan. The most recent epidemiological data demonstrated that the prevalence of diabetes is approaching 5% and that the number of people with diabetes in Taiwan

Preventing non-communicable diseases: an integrated community approach

The drastic rise in childhood obesity worldwide reflects the impact of unhealthy modern lifestyles. Over the last decade and a half, the increase of high-sugar, high-fat processed foods in our diets has combined with sedentary behaviour to radically and negatively affect the health of our societies. Initiatives are urgently required which can reduce the resulting individual and societal burden to physical and psychological health and economic development.

Political support groups can advance our cause

One day in 1997, when he and his family should have been celebrating his wife’s birthday, Guy Barnett’s life changed abruptly: having been diagnosed with type 1

Diabetes care and prevention in Iran

The world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which is occurring in the low- and middle-income countries; it is projected that by 2025, more than 75% of people with diabetes will live in developing countries. This is having a major impact on the quality of life of hundreds of millions people and their families. Furthermore, the negative effects of the obesity-driven diabetes pandemic are being felt in the economy of those countries that are in most need of development.

Large-scale diabetes awareness and prevention in South India

Diabetes has become a major health problem in developing countries, where non-communicable conditions are rapidly overtaking communicable diseases as the most common cause of death. Recent World Health Organization (WHO)

Fighting diabetes and obesity: what has been done so far?

The urgent need to tackle obesity and prevent type 2 diabetes is now widely acknowledged, particularly by the health ministers worldwide who in May 2004 gave their unanimous approval to the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health. Many health ministries around the world have policies to cope with these most pressing public health issues. But their detailed strategies are often unclear. Indeed, almost everywhere, national programmes to address obesity and diabetes are still under development.

Therapeutic diabetes education: the Cuban experience

Cuba is a small island country in the Caribbean with 11 million inhabitants. As in other countries, diabetes is a major challenge to health in Cuba. In order to reduce the health and economic impact of diabetes and improve the quality of life of people with the condition, a country-wide diabetes education programme began development over 30 years ago, linking and promoting optimum care and education. Rosario García and Rolando Suárez report on the achievements of the programme and highlight the central role of diabetes education over three decades of care initiatives in Cuba.

A protocol for the nutritional management of diabetes in the Caribbean

Over the last 10-15 years, various regional institutions in the Caribbean have developed protocols for the clinical management of diabetes. These have been used to improve the quality of care for people with the condition. However, the nutritional component of care was not adequately addressed in these recommendations and no standardized regional guidelines existed. Godfrey Xuereb reports on the development of a formal protocol for the nutritional management of diabetes and related conditions in the Caribbean region.

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