National diabetes programmes

English

A holistic approach to diabetes care in Bolivia

Bolivia is a land-locked country in central South America. Bordered by five nations, it is one of the so-called developing countries; levels of infant mortality and illiteracy are among the highest in the world. While Bolivia is rich in ethnic and cultural diversity and natural resources, including silver and natural gas, the development of the nation continues to be constrained by economic and societal problems which affect all levels of society. Furthermore, the areas of health and education have

Enhancing diabetes education and awareness using limited resources

In his Nobel Prize lecture, the writer VS Naipaul described from the point of view of a boy of Indian origin born in Trinidad in the 1930’s the ethnic and cultural diversity of this small southern Caribbean island state. In this culturally rich but challenging setting, with few available resources, diabetes educators have made significant advances in facilitating diabetes education in Trinidad and Tobago and in raising awareness of the condition countrywide. Zobida Ragbirsingh reports.

Reviving the St Vincent Declaration

On the occasion of the signing of the St Vincent Declaration in St Vincent, Italy in October 1989, representatives of diabetes organizations and government health departments from European countries agreed unanimously on key health objectives for people with diabetes. Five-year targets were incorporated within the framework of the Declaration, which effectively recognized that diabetes outcomes were measurable; European nations were thus challenged to improve standards of care.

The human perspective on health-care reform: coping with diabetes in Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan is a small mountainous country with a predominantly agricultural economy; it gained independence with the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991. For a significant sector of the Kyrgyzstani population, economic difficulties at national level translate into high unemployment and widespread impoverishment. Kyrgyzstan inherited an extensive but basic health-care system, with a functioning – albeit fragmented – structure for managing chronic diseases.

Diabetes care in need

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Integrating psycho-social issues into national diabetes programmes

It is widely agreed that people with diabetes can lead a 'normal' life. Like people who do not have the condition, people with diabetes can function fully in family, workplace, and community settings. However, it is also accepted that diabetes self-care is complex and demanding. Being obliged to balance food intake and exercise against medication, self-administer injections, and self-test blood for glucose levels is not 'normal'. The demands of diabetes self-management can impact negatively on the psychological status of people with the condition. In this article, Ruth

Psycho-social care for people with diabetes: what the guidelines say

Results from a number of recent studies highlight the importance of psycho-social factors in diabetes management. Research shows that psychological co-morbidity is prevalent in people with diabetes. As a result, well-being, self-care and glycaemic control are adversely affected. Depression is common in people with diabetes, and

National diabetes centres guarantee better healthcare in Hungary

People with diabetes in Hungary have access to free insulin, subsidized medication and diabetes equipment within a healthcare system whereby diabetes care is provided mainly by General Practitioners (GPs). Only a small number of people with diabetes - those with type 1 and difficult type 2 cases - are treated at national diabetes centres. These diabetes centres however provide a guarantee for better healthcare for all by consulting with and organizing postgraduate training for family doctors.

DOTA steps up activities

The Declaration of the Americas on Diabetes (DOTA) programme has been endorsed by all nations in the Americas to combat the rising tide of diabetes prevalence. Since its inception in 1996, DOTA has piloted many successful programmes in various member countries.

Turkey responds to St Vincent

In Anatolia, the quality of diabetes care is generally lower than in the rest of Turkey. Half the people with diabetes living in this region are not aware of their condition. Neither are many on any treatment. Since last year, prompted by the aims of the St Vincent Declaration, the South-eastern Anatolia Diabetes Project (GAPDIAB) has been in operation in response to this situation.

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