National diabetes programmes

English

Latest studies clarify state of health in Bahrain

For the past few decades, the Government of Bahrain has been consistently and conscientiously updating the country’s healthcare system, endeavouring to keep up with the demands placed upon it. Luckily so, because, in 1994 it was found that the figures they had been dealing with were way off track. In 1989, a Committee for Primary Care was formed by the Government of Bahrain’s Ministry of Health, standardizing care through establishing rules and regulations to guide physicians treating people with diabetes.

Getting governements to listen to economic facts

Over £5.2 billion a year – 9 percent of the entire National Health Service budget – is spent on diabetes and its complications in the UK. There is no doubt that diabetes is a significant health economic issue here, as it is elsewhere in the world. Although diabetes is not consistently high on the government’s priority list, Diabetes UK has been successful in forming a strong lobby, which is increasing in political weight.

Epidemiological studies lay the ground for Syrian diabetes campaign

As in many countries of the world, Syria, with its 16 million inhabitants, has witnessed a tremendous change in food habits and lifestyle within the last few decades. This has been reflected in the rise of metabolic diseases in general and diabetes in particular. Three studies have shown that the prevalence of diabetes in Syria is probably higher than published reports have claimed. One of the aims of the Syrian National Diabetes Programme, adopted in 1995, was to assess the national situation by carrying out epidemiological studies.

Diabetes to priority for Iranian National Advisory Committee

The first systematic epidemiological studies in Iran were begun in 1993. However, in light of the growing number of people with diabetes and the accruing costs, estimated to exceed US$400 million a year, a need was recognized in 1998 to study the more recent epidemiology of diabetes in Iran. In 1998 the National Committee for Diabetes was formed, and a project undertaken in 1999 involving nearly 2.5 million people. Many other substantial moves have been made in Iran to help deal with diabetes in the country.

Epidemiology, clinical medicine and public health: at the interface

In today’s health-conscious world, ill health is no longer an inexplicable ‘act of God’, nor a punishment for wrong-doing nor an evil spell. The marriage of medicine and science, scarcely a century old, has revealed much about the causes of disease, how to treat it and, increasingly, how to prevent it. This is particularly valid for people with diabetes, a condition which, over the years, has prompted increased understanding and acquisition of knowledge. The disorder has been recognized and described almost since the written human record started.

Implementing national diabetes programmes in Latin America

The prevalence of diabetes in Latin America will double within the next couple of decades. Type 2 diabetes is already among the first 10 causes of mortality in the Latin American adult population due to chronic complications related to premature and accelerated atherosclerosis. It is also estimated that around one third of these women and half of these men remain undiagnosed for years. Latin America must, therefore, be prepared for an epidemic with serious consequences.

Comprehensive care in a low-income country: the Ghana experience

In the 1950s and 1960s diabetes prevalence in Ghana was estimated at between 0.2% and 0.4% in adults. However, a recent analysis of admissions to the largest hospital in the country reveals that diabetes accounts for 6.8% of all adult admissions. Despite the fact that diabetes is clearly a major health problem in Ghana, the country has no separate diabetes healthcare policy. To address these issues, a three-year national programme, the Ghana Diabetes Programme, was initiated in 1995.

Setting the standards in England

In England we are currently increasing public spending on health faster than any major country in Europe. But, along with investing more, we need to do things differently. We need to look more radically at how health services are provided within a network of health and social care, shifting the balance between what we do in hospitals and what we do elsewhere. These are the principles that we will apply to modernizing diabetes treatment and that will underpin the ongoing work of the National Service Frameworks (NSF).

Slovenian St Vincent Declaration Board urges increased government action

Although diabetes is not included in the national ‘Health for All’ legislation, a new government, elected a year ago, brings with it the promise of a better future for people with diabetes in Slovenia. The new Minister of Health has displayed an interest in prevention policies concerning chronic diseases, as well as in promoting healthy lifestyle. The Slovenian Diabetes Association (SLODA) has taken some initial steps towards a closer co-operation with the new government.

DEHKO: Finland moves on primary prevention

In January 2000, the Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes 2000-2010 (DEHKO) was officially approved as Finland's national diabetes programme. The first audit of the programme in 2003 has reported that the implementation process is well underway in both primary and specialized healthcare. The atmosphere among healthcare providers is positive and enthusiastic, and the word DEHKO is now firmly established in the lexicon of diabetes care in Finland.

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