National diabetes programmes

English

Japanese school programmes combat type 2 diabetes

So-called 'late onset diabetes' is now more widely termed Type 2 diabetes. And for very good reasons. It was previously the case that childhood and adolescent diabetes was nearly exclusively Type 1 diabetes and that Type 2 diabetes very rarely affected the young. Sadly, this is no longer true. As the spread of 'westernized' lifestyles gives rise to a steep increase in rates of obesity worldwide, Type 2 diabetes is rapidly emerging among children and adolescents.

Fighting fat: with TAF in Singapore

In 1992, the Singapore government noted that the obesity prevalence among schoolchildren was 14%. Singapore's population has a relatively high prevalence of diabetes, at 9.2%. Rates of obesity and overweight are high – 6% of the adult population has a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2, and around 25% have a BMI above 25 kg/m2. Recent years have also seen the increasing appearance of young onset Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose

The English National Service Framework: worth waiting for?

Diabetes UK worked hard to influence the content of the National Service Framework (NSF) from the moment it was first announced by the then UK Health Secretary Frank Dobson in 1999. Indeed, we perceived the announcement of the NSF as a victory in itself – recognition at last that diabetes is a serious condition with major implications for the 1.4 million already diagnosed as well as those yet to be diagnosed. The long wait inevitably resulted in high expectations. However, many were not surprised when the government did not meet these expectations in their entirety.

The English National Service Framework: a primary care perspective

Martin Kent is a general practitioner with a special interest in the management and care of people with diabetes, and a clinical advisor in diabetes to the local Primary Care Trust (PCT). Matt Rangué is the Associate Director of Nursing & Clinical Governance to the Trust, with responsibility for workforce development, training and quality in the delivery of the new UK Diabetes National Service Framework (NSF). Martin and Matt see the UK Diabetes NSF as a valuable tool around which to plan and deliver services to people with diabetes.

Diabetes Action Now: WHO and IDF working together to raise awareness worldwide

Even among policy makers at an international and national level, awareness about the public health and clinical importance of diabetes remains low. Diabetes is widely perceived as a condition of low importance to the poorer populations in the world. In the low- and middle-income countries, the impact of diabetes is largely unrecognized. Yet the world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which will occur in the low- and middle-income countries.

Collaboration to support prevention

President's editorial

Awareness and education in Egypt: the DELTA project

Egypt and some of the Gulf countries have among the highest prevalence rates of diabetes in the world, notably Type 2 diabetes. Changes in socio-economic patterns, relatively rapid urbanization, and a 'fast-food culture' are taking their toll. In Egypt and the Gulf region, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now a major health problem, and high blood cholesterol levels and hypertension are recognized as 'silent killers'. However, there is relatively little awareness of the serious threat to health presented by diabetes, or its role in causing CVD.

A united stand on the diabetic foot: ISDF 2003

Too many of the nearly 200 million people in the world with diabetes suffer from diabetes-related foot complications. As a result, the impact on their quality of life is massive. The loss of a foot or part of a leg is the devastating end result of one

Primary care in Tunisia: improving diabetes management

Tunisia, like most countries of the world, is experiencing an alarming rise in the number of people with diabetes: the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in adults over 30 year of age rose from 4.2% in 1976 to 10% in 1995. In response, the Tunisian Ministry of Public Health have developed a National Programme of diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension) management in primary care. Initially introduced in 1993, the Programme was then implemented throughout the country in 1998.

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