Diabetes treatment > Access and supply

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Social stigma and discrimination: a care crisis for young women with diabetes in India

In most regions of the world, type 1 diabetes is more common in girls than in boys. Since the 1970s, a female excess has been reported in populations of African and Asian origins. Indeed, most countries have reported either no gender difference or increased incidence of type 1 diabetes in girls. Contrary to these worldwide findings, certain endocrine centres in northern India report a higher outpatient attendance of men and boys with type 1 diabetes.

Abject poverty, major difficulties and tragic outcomes in Cambodia

When her doctor diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes in 1997, it was shocking news to Sokhann. For more than a decade, she lived with her condition without any treatment, education or follow-up.

Bambi in danger - poverty and unmet needs in Mauritania

Bambi is a 19-year old Mauritanian woman. Illiterate and poor, she is married and has a four-year-old daughter. Early in 2008, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. It took her 10 months of struggle to learn to read her blood glucose monitoring device and inject insulin.

Turning points in the fight against diabetes

President's editorial

Meeting of the ways

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Inpatient care for people with diabetes - bringing good practice into hospital

People with diabetes occupy a significant proportion of hospital beds – about 10% in the UK, although this may be an underestimate. While diabetes specialists are often based in a hospital, the majority of people with diabetes who are admitted to hospital – at a time when their diabetes might be difficult to control – do not actually meet the diabetes team.

Disease management programmes for diabetes in Germany

The number of people with diabetes is on the rise worldwide, posing previously unknown challenges for healthcare systems. In Germany, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes is estimated to be nearly 7% – almost 6 million people. Additionally, it is estimated that  around another 3 million people living with diabetes are undiagnosed – around half the population with diabetes aged between 55 and 74 years according to one German study.

The extraordinary challenges faced by young people with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Diabetes in young people is a heavy burden all over the world but it is particularly severe in developing countries. Although the condition is the same, the context can be very different. Young people with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo have to face a number of major challenges. They are perceived as having a ‘mysterious disease’ which requires a lot of attention on a daily basis throughout a lifetime. Belief in spells is quite common in Africa, and many families feel it is their responsibility to find the person responsible for causing the diabetes.

The Border Health Strategic Initiative: addressing health disparities in border communities

Approximately 13 million people reside in the 80 Mexican municipalities and 48 US counties located along the US-Mexico border; 86% of those people live in 14 pairs of sister cities – metropolitan areas divided by the frontier. Border residents share similar resources and environmental problems. Issues of great concern include air quality, the availability and quality of water, and animal control. The communities along the border are economically and socially interdependent, with more than a million legal north- and southbound crossings every day.

Improvements in care for people with diabetes in Mozambique

An article in this magazine in March 2004 described the Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access in Mozambique, and some of the results from its implementation. Since it was carried out in 2003, much has changed in Mozambique with regards to access to insulin and diabetes care. The Protocol provided vital information on the areas that the healthcare system needed to focus upon in order to improve care.

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