Diabetes treatment > Access and supply

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Unite to protect health worldwide

President's Editorial

Lessons from Nigeria: the fight against counterfeit drugs in Africa

The sale of counterfeit products is a problem in most countries. Every year, about 7% of world trade, valued at about 280 billion USD, is lost due to counterfeiting. In the information technology sector, products worth an estimated 20 billion USD are currently in circulation. But the huge financial losses incurred by manufacturers and individual customers as a result of the trafficking of fake goods are overshadowed by the tragic human costs: the pharmaceutical industry, and consequently the marketplace, are flooded with counterfeits.

Focus on the front line: l'Association Malienne de Lutte contre le Diabète

Contrary to the now outdated idea of diabetes as a disease of rich people in rich countries, the condition is increasingly widespread in Africa. Mali, the second-largest country in West Africa, bordering the Sahara desert to the north and Côte d’Ivoire and Senegal to the south, has not escaped the budding epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Overall prevalence is thought to exceed 2% – nearly a quarter of a million people. Most of these have type 2 diabetes and live in the urban areas.

Diabetes and traditional medicine in Africa

In Africa, there is said to be one traditional healer to every 200 people; an estimated 80% of people in the continent turn to traditional medicine as a source of primary care, including those with diabetes. In settings that are characterized by shortcomings in healthcare provision resources, traditional healers are making selective use of biomedical knowledge and language to enhance the perceived effectiveness of their treatments.

Diabetes care in Sudan: emerging issues and acute needs

Sudan is the largest country in Africa and one of the poorest in the world. Its population is estimated at around 37 million; the capital Khartoum, with approximately 6 million inhabitants, is growing rapidly. There are hundreds of ethnic and tribal divisions and language groups within the two distinct major cultures in Sudan – Arabs with Nubian roots and non-Arab Black Africans. The lack of effective collaboration among these groups continues to be a serious problem.

A diabetes strategy for Africa: investing in health, protecting our people

The burgeoning epidemic of diabetes in Africa will exact a terrible toll from the people and economies of the region. The costs of the condition and its complications are already unacceptably high. Every day in Africa, large numbers of children and adults die because they cannot pay for the insulin they need to survive; many more die before a diagnosis can be made. But diabetes can be controlled through relatively small investments and prevented entirely through simple cost-effective interventions.

The year of the disadvantaged and the vulnerable

The International Diabetes Federation is engaged in a global strategic plan to raise awareness of diabetes. One of the principal tools to help unite awareness-raising efforts worldwide is IDF’s World Diabetes Day campaign. Spread over 12 months, the campaign climaxes in the World Diabetes Day celebrations that take place on or around 14 November. World Diabetes Day offers a unique opportunity for the global diabetes community to celebrate the lives of people with diabetes and raise awareness of the condition among the general public and healthcare decision makers.

Diabetes, deprivation and outcomes in the wealthy world

In a significant number of people, both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes progress to the development of vascular complications and ultimately

Health insurance for all: the key to improved diabetes management?

Meeting the costs of diabetes represents a major challenge. Proper diabetes care requires complex life-long management, making the condition one of the costlier chronic diseases. In 2006, the awareness-raising efforts of the global diabetes community will highlight the health status of people who are vulnerable or underserved. Not limited to populations in the developing world, this group includes people with diabetes in even the wealthiest countries. In the USA, where financial health cover is widely linked to employment, there are huge and increasing

Building Blocks in diabetes care and prevention in Paraguay

An ongoing initiative of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization focuses on the development of basic procedures to improve diabetes prevention and control: the Building Blocks project. A set of diabetes care guidelines based on the Building Blocks principles resulted from a number of regional workshops involving experts in a variety of diabetes-related fields

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