Lifestyle interventions

English

The IDF Perspective: reforming the global food system to tackle diabetes and obesity

The role and responsibilities of the private sector in global health and development have evolved in recent decades. The view that the only responsibility of business is to return a profit to stakeholders is being weakened by the dawn of corporate shared values and a mushrooming of public-private partnerships, both of which have resulted in the leveraging of resources and expertise of the private sector to bear on many contemporary global health challenges.


Why health matters to human development

Helen Clark, Administrator of the UN Development Programme, reflects on the development agenda post-2015 and explains how better prevention and care of Non-communicable Diseases fit into her vision for a broader development goal thereby decreasing the threat NCDs pose to progress.

Healthy Cities report

In our first Healthy Cities report, Diabetes Voice highlights municipal and national governing policies that are trailblazing new directions for human health.  

W.A.S.H. away the world’s dietary salt

The world’s current dietary salt consumption, more than twice the daily amount recommended, is rubbing the wound of declining public health. Increasing evidence suggests that a high salt intake may directly increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity through soft drink consumption, and many other preventable diseases, including cancers. Restricting dietary salt is even more critical for high-risk populations, such as diabetes.

Anthropometric indicators of obesity for identifying cardiometabolic risks in a rural Bangladeshi population – Chandra Diabetes Study

Professor Akhtar Hussain’s aim of studying anthropometric indicators of obesity was to evaluate the predictive ability of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentages for the presence of cardiometabolic risks—namely type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome.

D-START: supporting innovative translational research projects in developing countries

In the three years since its inception and after two initial rounds of funding, the International Diabetes Federation’s BRIDGES programme has become one of the principal funding initiatives in diabetes worldwide. With the recent announcement of its third round of funding, BRIDGES has consolidated its position in the fast-developing and innovative sector of translational research.

Protecting the junk-food generation - the need for international intervention

An unhealthy diet is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, so what can we do to help people eat healthily? An important step is to ensure that children are encouraged to eat healthy food, and are not subjected to marketing that promotes energy-dense food that is high in fat, sugar and salt. Justin Macmullan looks at profit-driven but potentially dangerous marketing practices, and calls for an international code of practice to prevent the children of today from becoming the junk-food generation of tomorrow.


Art beyond therapy: when patients and healthcare providers share the limelight

Healthcare implies sound knowledge in the field of biomedicine, underpinned by evidence-based medicine. There is another fundamental dimension: the healthcare provider-patient relationship. Balint studied the gap between the professional identity of doctors and the reality of patients – an ocean of unspoken messages separates their worlds. The further dimension is that of therapeutic education, the objective of which is to help people to become more autonomous. In these three aspects of healthcare, the relationship between patients and doctors is never even.

Art as a development process for people with a chronic condition

There are various ways to improve people’s capacity to cope with the psychological burden of a chronic condition. A recent programme based on self-expression through painting demonstrated a way of discovering a person’s potential for development and self-efficacy. This report describes the structure and process of a painting workshop programme for people affected by a chronic condition. Attending one or several painting workshops, the participants used the art material to express and give shape to their inner suffering associated with their condition.

The Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative - tackling type 2 diabetes in Canada

In 2005, the Government of Canada provided a renewed investment of 190 million CAD over five years to maintain and enhance the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative. The main goal of the Initiative is to reduce type 2 diabetes and its complications through a range of culturally relevant health promotion and prevention services, delivered by trained health service providers and diabetes workers. Supported by Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative funding, Aboriginal communities across Canada are working to prevent and  manage type 2 diabetes. Amy Bell reports.

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