Lifestyle interventions

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IDF and BRIDGES span the globe to tackle diabetes

Translational research helps to apply successful outcomes from basic science into practical real-life applications in communities. Today, this type of research is gaining widespread attention in the prevention and treatment of diabetes.

Schools open doors to lifestyle lessons in Tunisia


An epidemiological transition is occurring in Tunisia. Prevalence of diabetes has increased from 2.3% in 1977 to 6.4% in 1990 and reached 10 to 15% in 2000. Increased diabetes prevalence is rising hand-in-hand with obesity, which represents an important risk factor of type 2 diabetes.

Reducing diabetes risk after gestational diabetes

Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes has been shown to be effective in many parts of the world. It has been years since important studies affirmed that preventative measures such as moderate weight loss, moderate physical activity and low-fat, high fibre food choices can help offset impaired glucose tolerance from progressing to a case of  type 2 diabetes.1,2

Lifestyle intervention eases battle with diabetes

Pakistan is the sixth most populous country in Southeast Asia with a population exceeding 180 million. Today, diabetes prevalence in Pakistan is estimated to be 6.8%.1 In 2010, a World Bank report warned that Pakistan is facing a health crisis, with rising rates of diabetes, obesity, heart disease obesity and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Motivating better diabetes self-care with SMS text messaging

Good self-management is crucial for experiencing a healthy life with diabetes. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Diabetes Self-Management Support (DSMS) activities provide a process for people living with diabetes to gain the knowledge and skills needed to modify their behaviour. DSME and DSMS also help people with diabetes self-manage the disease and related conditions.

Education to change the course of diabetes in the Caribbean

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that over 382 million people currently live with diabetes globally. This accounts for 11% of the adult population and is projected to increase to near 592 million by 2035. The data reveals that over 80% of persons living with diabetes are from developing countries.

Health coaching increases self-esteem and healthy smiles

Promoting oral health is essential in order to prevent and reduce the negative consequences of type 2 diabetes and to maintain good health.1 Tragically, periodontal disease significantly contributes to the risk of dying from diabetes.

Can a peer support intervention improve type 2 diabetes outcomes?

The IDF Perspective: reforming the global food system to tackle diabetes and obesity

The role and responsibilities of the private sector in global health and development have evolved in recent decades. The view that the only responsibility of business is to return a profit to stakeholders is being weakened by the dawn of corporate shared values and a mushrooming of public-private partnerships, both of which have resulted in the leveraging of resources and expertise of the private sector to bear on many contemporary global health challenges.


Why health matters to human development

Helen Clark, Administrator of the UN Development Programme, reflects on the development agenda post-2015 and explains how better prevention and care of Non-communicable Diseases fit into her vision for a broader development goal thereby decreasing the threat NCDs pose to progress.

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