Lifestyle interventions

English

Prevention of diabetes and its complications: key goals in Finland

The 10-year National Diabetes Programme in Finland (DEHKO) has been up and running for 6 years. The formal evaluations carried out to date indicate that the Programme continues to have a positive impact in a number of areas of diabetes care in Finland. Moreover, prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications remain the principle objectives of DEHKO. Timo Saaristo and Leena Etu-Seppälä report on FIN-D2D (2003-2007), the DEHKO project to implement primary prevention of type 2 diabetes in five regions – potentially affecting 1.5 million people.

Barriers to healthcare among homeless people with diabetes

It is estimated that about half of all homeless people suffer from chronic medical conditions. Unfortunately, these people frequently encounter many more barriers to care than the general population – exacerbating their health problems. The plight of homeless people with diabetes is particularly severe, since managing the condition requires adherence to a demanding care plan.

Promoting global action on the social determinants of health

Throughout the world, socially disadvantaged people with inadequate access to health resources suffer worse health status and die younger than people in more privileged social positions. Yet although the greatest share of health problems is attributable to living conditions, health policies are dominated by disease-focused solutions that largely ignore the social environment. As a result, inequalities have widened and health interventions have obtained less than optimal results.

The Kahnawake Schools Project: diabetes prevention in the Mohawk community

Type 2 diabetes is at epidemic proportions among Aboriginal people in Canada – around 15% of the Aboriginal population from 15 years and older. During the 1980s, healthcare providers at the local hospital in Kahnawake Mohawk Territory near Montreal, Quebec, noticed high rates of diabetes among people with cardiovascular

Obesity and the metabolic syndrome in young people

As the number of children with obesity continues to grow, the health implications of the condition are becoming increasingly evident: an unprecedented epidemic of type 2 diabetes is emerging in obese and overweight young people. At the time of diagnosis of diabetes, cardiovascular disease may already be present, even in young adults. The close association between type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease led to the hypothesis that the two may arise from a common antecedent, the metabolic syndrome – a cluster of metabolic disorders.

Treating the syndrome today and in the future

We can take advantage of the metabolic syndrome: it can be used as a simple and effective tool to assess health risks in people with type 2 diabetes and those without the condition. We can benefit from the universal availability of the tools needed to make a diagnosis – at no further cost. Given the excessive levels of death and disability suffered by people with type 2 diabetes and its associated conditions, it is of the utmost importance that early and appropriate steps are taken once a diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is made. Fortunately, there

The metabolic syndrome: genetics, lifestyle and ethnicity

Over a few million years, human genes gradually evolved, enabling us to survive frequent periods of famine. Our genes are still essentially the same; but we are currently exposed to lifestyles for which we are not programmed. We were

The price of 'progress'? Diabetes in Indigenous Australians

Indigenous Australians have poorer health than the rest of the Australian population; for Aboriginal people, life expectancy is about 20 years less than for the general population. Significantly though, the low expectation of life in Indigenous Australians is less associated with high child mortality, as occurs in many groups in developing countries; the big differences are among young to middle-aged adults.

Footcare education for people with diabetes: a major challenge

Although diabetes-related amputations are preventable, for too many people around the world, losing a limb or part of a limb is a tragic consequence of having diabetes. The high rates of these amputations are an indication of inadequacies in the delivery of health care, which create enormous challenges for those attempting to access high quality foot education and care. In this article, Margaret McGill focuses on current recommendations for health-care providers and makes a call for an individualized approach to diabetes foot care.

Advocacy for health: lessons from the anti-tobacco campaign

A newspaper columnist in the UK recently grumbled that, ‘The anti-smoking groundswell seems to have come from nowhere. Why didn’t it occur in 2000 or 1996 or 1986?’ He admitted to being a smoker, and wondered why he was becoming a ‘social pariah’. The reality, of course, is that the health risks of smoking have been known for more than a generation; that the health community has long been demanding a public policy approach to effective tobacco control, and that political change – especially concerning sensitive and contested issues – takes time.

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