Lifestyle interventions

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The changing face of diabetes: medical nutrition therapy

Previously disregarded due to the lack of strong clinical evidence supporting its effectiveness in the treatment of diabetes, the role of medical nutrition therapy has recently changed. This is all the more important given the link between diabetes and obesity, and the steady increase of the latter at a global level, particularly in the industrializing countries. So today, when advising on how to best manage the condition, diabetes healthcare teams are putting more and more emphasis on healthy lifestyles, of which nutrition is a major component.

Poverty versus genes: the social context of Type 2 diabetes

Together with its 'twin sister', childhood obesity, Type 2 diabetes is spreading among young people around the world. This constitutes a serious public health problem; by their 30s, generations of young people will have been living with Type 2

Globesity: a crisis of growing proportions

In the United States, the latest data show that two out of three adults are overweight, and nearly one in three is obese. Alarmingly, similar trends are emerging around the world. In countries as diverse as the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Kuwait, and Mexico at least half the population is overweight and one in five is obese.

Obesity, diabetes, and the child

This article by Martin Silink explains why children are becoming obese. He describes the scope of the obesity epidemic and explains how this is thought to be linked to diabetes. He investigates the causes of unhealthy eating habits and the decline in physical activity, and shows how these are impacting on the health of the world's children.

Prevention of diabetes throughout an obesogenic world

Overweight is an important risk factor for noncommunicable diseases in general and diabetes in particular. There is presently a global epidemic of overweight. A recent large study found a 5.6% growth in obesity in the United States in 2001, and a massive 74% increase since 1991. Twenty one percent of American adults are obese. The prevalence of diabetes, which correlates with obesity has risen 61% in the US since 1990. Diabetes rose 8% over 2000-01 to nearly 8% of the population. The situation is not much better in many developing countries.

The obesity campaign view of diabetes prevention

Obesity is an epidemic accelerating out of control. It is the driving force behind an equally dramatic explosion of Type 2 diabetes, both in adults and now alarmingly among children. Clearly, strategies aimed at improving the prevention and management of obesity must be developed. Not confined to affluent nations, the obesity epidemic imposes a double burden on countries where people are still struggling to overcome generations of chronic undernutrition. Economic progress in developing countries heralds changes in

Homocysteine and cardiovascular complications in diabetes

People with diabetes are prone to cardiovascular disease (CVD). In people with Type 2 diabetes, the rate of heart-related death is two to four times that in people without diabetes. Traditional risk factors for the build-up of cholesterol-rich plaques in the arteries (atherosclerosis), such as high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, and high blood fat levels (dyslipidaemia), are known to increase the cardiovascular risk in people with diabetes. However, other factors may be operative as well.

Food power: a vegetarian approach to diabetes

Recent research has demonstrated the health benefits of diet and exercise for people with diabetes. The positive results offer an optimistic future to millions of people with the condition, and the many millions more who are at risk from diabetes around the world. We now know that therapeutic lifestyle interventions are highly effective in both preventing and managing the condition. In people with Type 2 diabetes, lifestyle changes can reduce and even eliminate the need for

The health benefits of olive oil

However enticing 'the perfect Mediterranean diet' may sound, the mere mention of the word 'diet' can provoke a negative reaction in many people. Diets are associated with sacrifice and prohibited pleasure, and illness. However, the Mediterranean diet consists of a healthy and varied combination of foods. Moreover, while undoubtedly pleasant and appetizing, a Mediterranean diet consumed in the correct way can prevent a number of medical conditions.

Sisters Together: move more, eat better, prevent diabetes

Populations around the world are getting fatter. People of all ages are showing signs of diabetes and other conditions which are associated with being fat. It has been found that people of African, Asian and Hispanic origins are at particularly increased risk from obesity and obesity-related conditions such as diabetes. Due to a variety of cultural and socio-economic factors, women from these populations seem to be at especially high risk from the dangers of overweight.

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