Insulin

English

The challenge of adolescence: hormonal changes and sensitivity to insulin

Puberty is a period of rapid and radical physical, psychological and social change during which a child, in physiological terms, becomes an adult capable of reproduction. Adolescence refers as much to the psychosocial characteristics of development during puberty as to the physical changes. Adolescents with diabetes, who need to adhere to a complex medical regimen based around self-care throughout this period of development, face a series of particular and considerable challenges.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

An overview of non-medical prescribing: past, present and future

The move towards non-medical prescribing is a process that has evolved over the past 20 years. But some diabetes healthcare professionals continue to question its benefits. In this article, June James looks at the challenges surrounding non-medical prescribing and describes the training required for effective prescribing. The author focuses mainly on work undertaken in the UK but also explores non-medical prescribing in other countries, and the potential impact this might have on diabetes care worldwide.

Against the odds: overcoming diabetes in Patagonia

When I met Sonia Carrasco, 14 years ago, she was suffering from diabetes ketoacidosis – extremely high glucose levels, a sign of poorly controlled diabetes. Although she had been living with the condition for about 6 years, her diabetes knowledge was minimal, reflecting a general lack of health awareness. When I asked Sonia to describe her feelings the day she was given a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, 20 years before, she recalls an experience made all the more terrifying by an acute fear of the unknown. She had understood that she had leukaemia.

National and regional organization: the key to effective diabetes care in Moscow

According to the federal statistics agency of the Russian Federation, the country’s population is in a phase of negative growth and currently stands at around 143 million. There are 2.3 million people registered with diabetes, 2 million of whom have type 2 diabetes. However, according to recent epidemiological research, there may be some 8 million people living with the condition in Russia. Success in addressing the problems relating to diabetes and its complications largely depends on the effective organization of diabetes care at regional and national levels.

Barriers to healthcare among homeless people with diabetes

It is estimated that about half of all homeless people suffer from chronic medical conditions. Unfortunately, these people frequently encounter many more barriers to care than the general population – exacerbating their health problems. The plight of homeless people with diabetes is particularly severe, since managing the condition requires adherence to a demanding care plan.

Access to care - the key to development

Editorial

IDF and the bigger picture

President's Editorial

Use of oral glucose-lowering drugs and insulin

It is important not to think of diabetes as being ‘treated’. And it is important not to think of diabetes management as being about lowering blood glucose levels alone. Other aspects of management are important enough to require separate chapters, both in the Global Guideline and in this Supplement. Nevertheless, the control of blood glucose is central to the management of type 2 diabetes, and nearly all people with the condition will need oral glucose-lowering drugs or insulin to help optimize this important cardiovascular risk factor.

Lessons from Nigeria: the fight against counterfeit drugs in Africa

The sale of counterfeit products is a problem in most countries. Every year, about 7% of world trade, valued at about 280 billion USD, is lost due to counterfeiting. In the information technology sector, products worth an estimated 20 billion USD are currently in circulation. But the huge financial losses incurred by manufacturers and individual customers as a result of the trafficking of fake goods are overshadowed by the tragic human costs: the pharmaceutical industry, and consequently the marketplace, are flooded with counterfeits.

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