Insulin

English

Gene therapy: looking for alternatives to insulin injection

Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes greatly increase the risk of dying from heart disease and are leading causes of blindness, leg amputation and kidney failure. There is now conclusive evidence that these long-term complications of diabetes can be prevented by keeping blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible. However, achieving this with conventional insulin injections results in a three-fold increase in the number of incapacitating attacks due to low glucose levels.

Argentina's crisis triggers health emergency - The diabetes community's response

Diabetes affects an estimated 3.3% of the adult population in Argentina. For many of these people, insulin is a life-sustaining drug. Without uninterrupted access to insulin, people dependent on this drug for survival face the real possibility of death, some within days. The collapse of the reimbursement system and speculation have caused grave interruptions in the supply of medicines such as insulin and now an emergency response is expected from the Argentinean authorities.

Addressing the insulin challenges

President's editorial

Barriers to insulin accessibility: a hazard to life and health

For many people with diabetes insulin is essential to health. Indeed, there are few other conditions where the replacement of a hormone that the body has ceased producing can make an acute difference between life and death. Nevertheless, a recent data-gathering project in Central and Eastern Europe illustrated that, almost 80 years after its discovery, access to insulin supplies is still problematic.

Diabetes, fear, and self-loathing: one person's story

When he left home to attend his regular diabetes clinic, Ray Msengana was already feeling unwell. But when he was told that the treatment of his Type 2 diabetes was to change from tablets to insulin therapy, he rapidly felt a lot worse. In this candid account of life with diabetes, Ray Msengana describes the affective impact of the condition, and makes a call for changes in the way diabetes is managed.

Beta cell insulin therapy

The insulin pump offers advantages to some people with Type 1 diabetes, freeing them from the chore of administering a number of injections every day. However, the high cost of the pump and the need for careful supervision will limit its use to wealthy patients who can count on sophisticated medical support. This article proposes the use of "beta cell therapy" in order to create surrogate insulin-producing cells.

The activities of Insulin for Life Australia

Insulin for Life (IFL) is a non-profit, Australian-based organization established in 1999. This unique initiative evolved from the 20-year programme at the International Diabetes Institute in Melbourne.

Glucagon-like peptide 1: new therapies for Type 2 diabetes

We usually assume that the ups and downs of blood glucose are solely responsible for changes in the release of insulin into the circulation, such as in response to a meal. However, the release of insulin from the pancreas is supported by signals from the alimentary canal (gut). When food is transported from the stomach into the small intestine, from which glucose, fat and proteins are absorbed into the blood, gut hormones are released into the circulation. Around 50%

Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access: overcoming barriers to care

Over 80 years after the discovery of insulin, access to it is still problematic for people in many parts of the developing world. In February 2001, at a meeting between the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), a call was made for the establishment of a non-governmental organization to improve the sustainable, affordable and uninterrupted supply of quality insulin for people with Type 1 diabetes in areas of need.

Discrimination on high: flying on insulin

For the safety of the passengers and crew of an aeroplane, it is imperative that an airline pilot maintain a high level of fitness. There are a number of medical conditions which, once diagnosed, may prevent a pilot being allowed to fly a plane. If they can be stabilized, some conditions may allow a return to work. Other conditions are classed as 'non-medically certifiable'. Upon diagnosis of a non-medically certifiable condition, a pilot's medical certificate will be denied, and if already issued, it will be revoked.

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