Insulin

English

Why developing countries need access to cheap treatments for diabetes

There is still a widespread misconception that non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are not relevant to poor people in developing countries. For these people, medicines for the treatment of such conditions are regarded almost as a luxury. Scientific evidence testifies to the contrary. Non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are escalating in developing countries. This is giving rise to severe economic as well as human consequences. An effective public health strategy for poor countries requires continued access to low-cost, high-quality generic medicines.

Bringing advanced therapies to market faster: a role for biosimulation?

In the last 10 years, genomic and proteomic technologies have been applied to identify and develop a new generation of diabetes treatments. While these technologies have become increasingly automated, producing a deluge of potential therapeutic targets and biological insights, projections estimate that individual drug development time and cost will continue to rise and soon exceed 1 billion USD. A significant contributor to this rising cost is the large

Growth hormone: a potential treatment option in diabetes?

Despite major fluctuations in supply and demand, sophisticated mechanisms in the body maintain levels of blood sugar (glucose) within narrow limits. Although under normal conditions, insulin is the major regulator of blood glucose levels, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) play an important contributory role. Both of these hormones have potent effects on glucose metabolism which may be utilized in diabetes management. Richard Holt explains the growing interest in exploiting the effects of GH and IGF-1 for people with diabetes.

IDF child sponsorship: life for a child with diabetes

For a family in a developing country, having a child diagnosed with diabetes can bring an overwhelming financial burden, and often ends in heartbreak. The IDF Child Sponsorship Programme, Life for a child with diabetes was established to help meet the medical needs of children with diabetes in developing countries, their families, and those who care for them. The Programme provides support to children's diabetes centres in developing countries, so that best practice care for that country can be provided to children from even the poorest situations.

Towards an understanding of the genetic causes of diabetes

People develop Type 1 diabetes when their immune system specifically seeks out and destroys the insulin-producing ß-cells in their pancreas. The interaction of environmental factors with a number of gene variants results in the immune disturbance which causes the condition. In this article, Tony Merriman looks at the approaches used to identify the genes which make a person susceptible to Type 1 diabetes.

Pages