Health organizations

English

Can NGOs and INGOs be public health policy entrepreneurs?

At the global level, a defining feature of what is now called ‘global health governance’ is the extension of the role of policy actor beyond national governments and international agencies to include public/private partnerships, private foundations, international NGOs, as well as the private sector.


IDF and Rotary - reaching out to fight diabetes from the grassroots

IDF is an organization of associations in over 160 countries around the world. As such, it is organized from the ground up. Local associations deliver the programmes of the Federation. While offering counsel and advice as well as access to best practices, IDF seeks to empower the local association. Rotary International is a similar organization. The world’s largest and oldest service club, it has over 1.2 million members in more than 33,000 clubs in 160 countries.


The great awakening

President's editorial

The St Vincent Declaration 20 years on - defeating diabetes in the 21st century

One of the founders of the St Vincent movement, Michiel Krans, recently described the transformation in widely held perceptions of the role of people with diabetes during the years preceding the St Vincent Declaration in 1989.

Diabetes UK after 75 years - the way forward for a lasting association

Diabetes UK has come a long way. Since its humble beginnings in London in the early 20th century, when a handful of people with diabetes and medical professionals met in HG Wells’ London apartment, Diabetes UK has grown into a countrywide organization that is active in a range of fields, including advocacy for the rights of people with diabetes, scientific research, and public awareness-raising. In 2009, Diabetes UK, a key member association of the International Diabetes Federation, will celebrate its 75th anniversary at a national conference in Glasgow, UK.

Delivering hope, promise and support to Canadians living with diabetes

A staggering number of Canadians, 8.4 million, are currently living with diabetes or are at increased risk  of developing the condition during their lifetime. With 2.4 million affected by diabetes and 6 million in a state of ‘pre-diabetes’ – many of whom are unaware that they have impaired glucose tolerance – diabetes is an invisible, potentially deadly pandemic that affects a quarter of the Canadian population.

Education, advocacy, and support for research in Quebec

In this report, Serge Langlois provides information on the mission and objectives of Diabète Québec. Founded in 1954, Diabète Québec currently unites some 30,000 people with diabetes, healthcare professionals and around 50 affiliated associations that serve communities throughout Quebec – comprising a quarter of Canada’s population. The three pillars of Diabète Québec’s mission are to inform, raise awareness and prevent diabetes and its complications.


Disease management programmes for diabetes in Germany

The number of people with diabetes is on the rise worldwide, posing previously unknown challenges for healthcare systems. In Germany, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes is estimated to be nearly 7% – almost 6 million people. Additionally, it is estimated that  around another 3 million people living with diabetes are undiagnosed – around half the population with diabetes aged between 55 and 74 years according to one German study.

From research to response in Italy - working alongside the Ministry of Health

People with diabetes require a range of interventions to manage their condition – medical treatment in isolation is not enough. In order to achieve optimum blood glucose control, the psychological, social and emotional aspects of living with diabetes also require at-tention. Diabetes and its related human, social and economic effects are important issues for the Ministry of Health in Italy. The Ministry’s commission on diabetes is engaged in developing plans to improve primary and secondary prevention and care of the condition.

The global chronic disease burden: what is being done?

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that in 2005, HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria combined were responsible for around 4 million deaths. In the same year, chronic non-communicable diseases killed nearly 30 million people. Shocking as they are, these figures do not tell the full story of the disability, suffering and personal hardship that results from diabetes complications; or, on a larger economic scale, the enormous healthcare costs and lost productivity attributable to diabetes.

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