Health organizations

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In practice: DAWN in Latin America and the Caribbean

Relatively few studies have examined the psycho-social impact of diabetes. The Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) Programme addressed this issue in a study involving people with diabetes from 13 countries. A key finding was that depression was much more common in people with diabetes than in those without the condition, and was associated with impaired self-management and quality of life. Other studies confirm that depression often impairs metabolic control in people with the condition.

Keeping people at the centre of care: a challenge to health professionals?

The establishment of a practice which puts the person at the centre of care will require a change in the attitudes and beliefs of health professionals, and people with diabetes. A service which places the person with diabetes at the centre of care will undoubtedly demand the adoption of this philosophy by the organizations responsible for the delivery of diabetes care, as well as those networks serving the

Integrating psycho-social issues into national diabetes programmes

It is widely agreed that people with diabetes can lead a 'normal' life. Like people who do not have the condition, people with diabetes can function fully in family, workplace, and community settings. However, it is also accepted that diabetes self-care is complex and demanding. Being obliged to balance food intake and exercise against medication, self-administer injections, and self-test blood for glucose levels is not 'normal'. The demands of diabetes self-management can impact negatively on the psychological status of people with the condition. In this article, Ruth

National diabetes centres guarantee better healthcare in Hungary

People with diabetes in Hungary have access to free insulin, subsidized medication and diabetes equipment within a healthcare system whereby diabetes care is provided mainly by General Practitioners (GPs). Only a small number of people with diabetes - those with type 1 and difficult type 2 cases - are treated at national diabetes centres. These diabetes centres however provide a guarantee for better healthcare for all by consulting with and organizing postgraduate training for family doctors.

Minneapolis shows the way in improving large-scale diabetes care

More than 16 million Americans have diabetes. It is the sixth leading cause of death by disease in the USA. The American Diabetes Association’s Provider Recognition Programme, launched in 1997 to encourage and set standards for comprehensive and quality healthcare for people with diabetes, is working. Minneapolis has created such a model which has achieved ADA recognition. The result has been a significant improvement in blood glucose control among the HMOs’ patients, as well as better screening for – and control of – related risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Turkey responds to St Vincent

In Anatolia, the quality of diabetes care is generally lower than in the rest of Turkey. Half the people with diabetes living in this region are not aware of their condition. Neither are many on any treatment. Since last year, prompted by the aims of the St Vincent Declaration, the South-eastern Anatolia Diabetes Project (GAPDIAB) has been in operation in response to this situation.

Sponsor a child and save a life

Families of children with diabetes in developing countries are facing an impossible situation. In these regions, the full cost of managing a child with this condition is higher than the average total annual income. Consequently, children with diabetes frequently die quickly. To help alleviate this situation, IDF has commenced a sponsorship programme aiming to support children with diabetes in developing countries. The programme, Life for a Child, was launched at the 17th IDF Congress in Mexico City in November last year.

Empowerment and how it can be implemented: the role of diabetes associations

The definitions of empowerment are many but less varied. They all tend to refer to a ‘process’. In this article, Mr Bjørnar Allgot, Norway, briefly analyses the concept of empowerment and gives guidelines as to how this process can be achieved. Finally, as IDF Vice President, Mr Allgot sees the need for the International Diabetes Federation to create an effective tool for evaluating empowerment which can be used by member associations around the world.

How to develop a diabetes association: a case study on the Icelandic Diabetes Association

In Issue 3 1999 of Diabetes Voice, Dr Ástrádur Hreidarsson of the Endocrinology and Diabetic Clinics at the National University Hospital in Iceland’s capital, Reykjavik, wrote about how diabetes care is managed in this sparsely populated country. In the past two years, many further developments have taken place as a result of a close cooperation between the Icelandic Diabetes Association and the other Nordic countries.

Turning policy into action

Mr Luc Hendrickx is the new executive director of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). He holds degrees in linguistics and business management, and worked for 10 years in a similar organization in oncology before joining IDF on September 1. Luc was one of the founders and first president of the Associations Conference Forum, an international organization for communications and networking among association executives in conference management.

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