Health organizations

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Highlights of the 38th Annual Meeting of the EASD, Budapest 2002

The 38th Annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) took place in September on the banks of the Danube, in Budapest, Hungary. The conference provided an arena for industry to present new drugs and devices relevant to treatment of patients with diabetes.

45 years of improving care in Japan

2002 marked the 45th anniversary of the Japan Diabetes Society. The Society carries out diverse activities in support of basic and clinical research into diabetes, which is a major health burden in Japan. Indeed, recent research indicates that the Japanese are more likely than Europeans to develop Type 2 diabetes. Today there are 6.9 million people with diabetes in Japan. It is predicted that, if current lifestyle habits remain unchanged, there will be 10.8 million people with diabetes in the country by the year 2010.

The activities of Insulin for Life Australia

Insulin for Life (IFL) is a non-profit, Australian-based organization established in 1999. This unique initiative evolved from the 20-year programme at the International Diabetes Institute in Melbourne.

Diabetes research caught in the European spotlight

It all started in 1996, when the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) published a document entitled 'European Dimension of Diabetes Research'. Since then, enormous progress has been made towards a greater recognition of the relevance of diabetes research at European Union level.

Drug development and diabetes: can we ensure an open environment for their data?

The development of new drugs might contribute to the defeat of some diseases, including diabetes, for which no cure has yet been found. New drugs are necessary and very welcome, provided that they are launched on the market following thorough, reliable and independent clinical evaluation of their safety and effectiveness. This article digs into this issue, providing an example of the repercussions that market pressures and inadequate clinical reporting have had in the lives of people with diabetes.

Towards greater awareness

President's editorial

IDF and WHO initiatives to put diabetes on the health agenda in Africa

Although the exact magnitude of the problem in Africa is not well understood, diabetes is a serious threat to public health throughout the continent. In 2003, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) predicted that by 2010, diabetes prevalence in Africa would increase by around 95%. Ignoring diabetes could lead to the breakdown of the fragile health systems in Africa, which are already overwhelmed by communicable diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

Diabetes Action Now: WHO and IDF working together to raise awareness worldwide

Even among policy makers at an international and national level, awareness about the public health and clinical importance of diabetes remains low. Diabetes is widely perceived as a condition of low importance to the poorer populations in the world. In the low- and middle-income countries, the impact of diabetes is largely unrecognized. Yet the world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which will occur in the low- and middle-income countries.

Diabetes and the World Health Organization

The aim of the World Health Organization (WHO) is the achievement of the highest possible level of health for all the world's people. From its global headquarters in Geneva and its Regional Offices, it assists national governments achieve this aim by setting international norms and standards, and providing leadership and technical support. WHO has substantial influence and prestige and has several major accomplishments to its credit, most notably the global eradication of smallpox in 1979, and major reductions in the burden of polio, leprosy, river blindness and tuberculosis.

WDF and diabetes care in Tanzania: making a difference

The World Diabetes Foundation (WDF) is dedicated to supporting prevention and management of diabetes in the developing world. Accordingly it funds sustainable projects in education, capacity building, and distribution and procurement of essential medical supplies. WDF creates partnerships and acts as a catalyst to help others

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