Healthcare costs

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W.A.S.H. away the world’s dietary salt

The world’s current dietary salt consumption, more than twice the daily amount recommended, is rubbing the wound of declining public health. Increasing evidence suggests that a high salt intake may directly increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity through soft drink consumption, and many other preventable diseases, including cancers. Restricting dietary salt is even more critical for high-risk populations, such as diabetes.

The untold burden of the non-communicable disease epidemic

The recent Global Risks 2010 report issued by the World Economic Forum identifies chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as one of the most important threats to the world’s agenda and a severe risk for global economic loss. NCDs, including diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and cancer, are already extraordinarily costly to governments and the private sector, crowding out essential monies for needed government services and reducing profits.

Developing a global framework to address non-communicable diseases

Heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer are now among the leading causes of death and disability around the world. The causes of these diseases include modifiable lifestyle-related risk factors, such as smoking, poor diet, lack of physical activity, as well as non-modifiable risk factors, including age and genetics. Due to population growth and the relative success of efforts to reduce communicable diseases, the number of people with non-communicable diseases will continue to rise in the future.

The economics of chronic disease: the case for government intervention

Much is heard of late about the high costs of chronic diseases like diabetes: chronic diseases are going to ‘break the bank’, impose tremendous costs on already struggling healthcare systems, and, very possibly, hinder growth in developing countries. Often, however, the suffering of people with chronic diseases seems to be lost in all the talk of money.

Chronic diseases: a growing problem in developing countries

Chronic diseases are increasing in global prevalence and seriously threaten developing nations’ ability to improve the health of their populations. Indeed, chronic disease has become the dominant health burden in many developing countries. It is estimated that in 2005, chronic diseases were responsible for 50% of deaths and illness in 23 selected developing countries. Surveys from countries in all corners of the world reveal significant health and economic consequences from chronic diseases, with the greatest impact likely to occur in the poor countries that are least able to respond.

Diabetes care in Nicaragua: results of the RAPIA study

Nicaragua, located in Central America, is the second poorest country in the western hemisphere. Around half of its population of 5 million people lives on less than 1 USD per day. Nicaragua is facing a growing burden of non-communicable diseases. In 2000, the Ministry of Health reported that the leading causes of death were heart attack, stroke, perinatal death (foetal and new-born) and diabetes. In 2002, deaths due to chronic diseases represented 37% of the total; deaths due to communicable diseases fell from 14.5% in 1985 to less than 5% in 2002.

Advocating for the rights of people with diabetes in Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan is a landlocked, largely mountainous country, bordering Kazakhstan, China, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, and is therefore sometimes referred to as ‘the Switzerland of Central Asia’. But the dramatic beauty of its snow-capped mountains and Alpine gorges hides a terrible potential for destruction: heavy winter snow often leads to spring floods, provoking serious damage in valleys and lowlands.

The Jaipur Foot: an effective low-cost prosthesis for people with diabetes

In people with diabetes, optimal management of their condition, regular examinations, the use of adequate footwear, and education are the best strategies to prevent diabetes-related foot problems, such as ulceration. If foot problems cannot be prevented, these should be treated as early as possible. However, in many cases, some degree of amputation of lower limbs cannot be avoided. In people who undergo a major amputation, artificial limbs are required to enable them to continue normal daily life.

The IDF Task Force on Insulin, Test Strips and Other Diabetes Supplies: promoting access to care for everyone with diabetes


The BD commitment: diabetes education for all


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