Healthcare costs


Lack of access to diabetes care in the USA

I am a forty-seven year old white male living in Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA. For most of my life, I have lived in either southeast Michigan or northwest Ohio. I hold a Masters Degree and Bachelors Degree in Geology. For the last 17 years I have been employed in some form or another in the environmental resources divisions of major US car manufacturers. But neither my studies nor my employment record prepared me for the difficulties I have faced and the adversity I continue to endure in attempting to manage my diabetes.

New data, fresh perspectives: Diabetes Atlas, Third Edition

The third edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched in December 2006, at the 19th World Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in Cape Town, South Africa. The aim of the Atlas, which has been described as the flagship publication of IDF, is to provide the most recent and accurate information on diabetes in 2007 and provide estimates of the likely impact of the condition up to 2025. Its purpose is to disseminate the most up-to-date and salient facts concerning the scope, impact and burden of diabetes globally and on a regional and country-by-country basis.

An EU Declaration on diabetes: hopes and expectations

As early as 1989, the St Vincent Declaration warned Europeans of the dangers of ignoring the burgeoning diabetes epidemic. The Declaration called on governments, diabetes organizations and professional societies from countries throughout Europe to unite in efforts to tackle the growing challenge to healthcare in the region. There were high hopes among the European diabetes community that significant action would be taken. But despite the broad stakeholder support for the Declaration’s objectives, significant progress failed to materialize.

Old age, poverty and the chronic disease epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean

The human population of our planet is aging. According to UN projections, by the middle of this century, the number of elderly people in the world will exceed the number of young people – for the first time in history. This trend started during the last half of the 20th century. Yet policy-makers are only now becoming aware of the gravity of the implications for developing countries of the rapid pace at which our populations are ageing.

Against the odds: overcoming diabetes in Patagonia

When I met Sonia Carrasco, 14 years ago, she was suffering from diabetes ketoacidosis – extremely high glucose levels, a sign of poorly controlled diabetes. Although she had been living with the condition for about 6 years, her diabetes knowledge was minimal, reflecting a general lack of health awareness. When I asked Sonia to describe her feelings the day she was given a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, 20 years before, she recalls an experience made all the more terrifying by an acute fear of the unknown. She had understood that she had leukaemia.

Waking up to diabetes in Papua New Guinea - Jacklyin's story

My daughter Jacklyin was born in January 1990, three months premature. Her early birth gave her unusual status among her family and the rest of the community in our village, Gumine – in the Province of Chimbu, in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. She would always be given our special protection and ate the best of all children in the village.

Prevention of diabetes and its complications: key goals in Finland

The 10-year National Diabetes Programme in Finland (DEHKO) has been up and running for 6 years. The formal evaluations carried out to date indicate that the Programme continues to have a positive impact in a number of areas of diabetes care in Finland. Moreover, prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications remain the principle objectives of DEHKO. Timo Saaristo and Leena Etu-Seppälä report on FIN-D2D (2003-2007), the DEHKO project to implement primary prevention of type 2 diabetes in five regions – potentially affecting 1.5 million people.

Access to care - the key to development


IDF and the bigger picture

President's Editorial

The IDF 'Global Guideline for Type 2 Diabetes': background and methods

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is not in the business of delivering clinical care to people with diabetes; but it is committed to the view that everyone with diabetes should benefit from the best possible care that could be available to them. One foundation of such care is to ensure that it is based on the best possible scientific knowledge. In this Supplement to Diabetes Voice we summarize in non-technical language the evidence base and recommendations of the IDF Global Guideline.