Healthcare costs

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Diabetes: its indirect costs. The costs of lost production

When someone is sick, be it short-term or long-term, we immediately think of the costs this person has to bear in terms of both physical pain and of the money needed to buy drugs and other supplies to get better or keep the condition under control. We might also go as far as to consider the financial costs borne by national healthcare systems. But there is more to health economics that this. Delve into this article to find out why we cannot remain blind to the so-called indirect costs of diabetes.

DEHKO: Finland moves on primary prevention

In January 2000, the Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes 2000-2010 (DEHKO) was officially approved as Finland's national diabetes programme. The first audit of the programme in 2003 has reported that the implementation process is well underway in both primary and specialized healthcare. The atmosphere among healthcare providers is positive and enthusiastic, and the word DEHKO is now firmly established in the lexicon of diabetes care in Finland.

Diabetic eye disease: how you can watch out for it

Among the most feared diabetes complications are those affecting the eyes. Indeed, diabetes is the leading cause of partial vision loss and blindness in the working age population in many countries. The good news is that it does not have to be so.

Global danger from pharmaceutical regulation

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

The English National Service Framework: worth waiting for?

Diabetes UK worked hard to influence the content of the National Service Framework (NSF) from the moment it was first announced by the then UK Health Secretary Frank Dobson in 1999. Indeed, we perceived the announcement of the NSF as a victory in itself – recognition at last that diabetes is a serious condition with major implications for the 1.4 million already diagnosed as well as those yet to be diagnosed. The long wait inevitably resulted in high expectations. However, many were not surprised when the government did not meet these expectations in their entirety.

The obesity campaign view of diabetes prevention

Obesity is an epidemic accelerating out of control. It is the driving force behind an equally dramatic explosion of Type 2 diabetes, both in adults and now alarmingly among children. Clearly, strategies aimed at improving the prevention and management of obesity must be developed. Not confined to affluent nations, the obesity epidemic imposes a double burden on countries where people are still struggling to overcome generations of chronic undernutrition. Economic progress in developing countries heralds changes in

The cost of kidney disease in India: one person's story

India is fast-becoming the diabetes capital of the world. More than 35.5 million people in India now have diabetes. This figure is likely to rise to 57 million by 2025. This increase, principally in people with Type 2 diabetes, is bringing with it a sharp growth in diabetic complications, including eye disease (retinopathy) and kidney disease (nephropathy). In this report, Ambady Ramachandran describes the costs of diabetes and kidney disease to a person in India

The costs of kidney disease

Existing and recent health-care interventions have the potential to reduce the economic impact of diabetes complications, including kidney (renal) disease. In this article, Thomas Songer provides a brief overview of current understanding regarding the costs related to kidney disease.

Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access: overcoming barriers to care

Over 80 years after the discovery of insulin, access to it is still problematic for people in many parts of the developing world. In February 2001, at a meeting between the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), a call was made for the establishment of a non-governmental organization to improve the sustainable, affordable and uninterrupted supply of quality insulin for people with Type 1 diabetes in areas of need.

Diabetes beyond healthcare

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

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