Healthcare costs

English

The English National Service Framework: worth waiting for?

Diabetes UK worked hard to influence the content of the National Service Framework (NSF) from the moment it was first announced by the then UK Health Secretary Frank Dobson in 1999. Indeed, we perceived the announcement of the NSF as a victory in itself – recognition at last that diabetes is a serious condition with major implications for the 1.4 million already diagnosed as well as those yet to be diagnosed. The long wait inevitably resulted in high expectations. However, many were not surprised when the government did not meet these expectations in their entirety.

The obesity campaign view of diabetes prevention

Obesity is an epidemic accelerating out of control. It is the driving force behind an equally dramatic explosion of Type 2 diabetes, both in adults and now alarmingly among children. Clearly, strategies aimed at improving the prevention and management of obesity must be developed. Not confined to affluent nations, the obesity epidemic imposes a double burden on countries where people are still struggling to overcome generations of chronic undernutrition. Economic progress in developing countries heralds changes in

The cost of kidney disease in India: one person's story

India is fast-becoming the diabetes capital of the world. More than 35.5 million people in India now have diabetes. This figure is likely to rise to 57 million by 2025. This increase, principally in people with Type 2 diabetes, is bringing with it a sharp growth in diabetic complications, including eye disease (retinopathy) and kidney disease (nephropathy). In this report, Ambady Ramachandran describes the costs of diabetes and kidney disease to a person in India

The costs of kidney disease

Existing and recent health-care interventions have the potential to reduce the economic impact of diabetes complications, including kidney (renal) disease. In this article, Thomas Songer provides a brief overview of current understanding regarding the costs related to kidney disease.

Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access: overcoming barriers to care

Over 80 years after the discovery of insulin, access to it is still problematic for people in many parts of the developing world. In February 2001, at a meeting between the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), a call was made for the establishment of a non-governmental organization to improve the sustainable, affordable and uninterrupted supply of quality insulin for people with Type 1 diabetes in areas of need.

Diabetes beyond healthcare

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

A new Diabetes Atlas: new data, new hope

"More than 300 million people world wide are at risk of developing diabetes, and the disease's economic impact in some hard-hit countries could be higher than that of the AIDS pandemic, diabetes experts warned." Reuters, 25 August 2003. This was the thrust of an article which was read by people all over the world on the day on which the second edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF).

Why developing countries need access to cheap treatments for diabetes

There is still a widespread misconception that non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are not relevant to poor people in developing countries. For these people, medicines for the treatment of such conditions are regarded almost as a luxury. Scientific evidence testifies to the contrary. Non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are escalating in developing countries. This is giving rise to severe economic as well as human consequences. An effective public health strategy for poor countries requires continued access to low-cost, high-quality generic medicines.

It's all kidneys

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Computer-simulated modelling in the management of diabetes

Diabetes has many complications which can take decades to develop. Scores of therapies are now available for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, and the complications of diabete. People with diabetes vary widely in their risks and histories of diabetes-related complications. How, then, can we choose from the many treatment options which are currently on offer to people with the condition?

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