Healthcare costs

English

A new Diabetes Atlas: new data, new hope

"More than 300 million people world wide are at risk of developing diabetes, and the disease's economic impact in some hard-hit countries could be higher than that of the AIDS pandemic, diabetes experts warned." Reuters, 25 August 2003. This was the thrust of an article which was read by people all over the world on the day on which the second edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF).

Why developing countries need access to cheap treatments for diabetes

There is still a widespread misconception that non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are not relevant to poor people in developing countries. For these people, medicines for the treatment of such conditions are regarded almost as a luxury. Scientific evidence testifies to the contrary. Non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are escalating in developing countries. This is giving rise to severe economic as well as human consequences. An effective public health strategy for poor countries requires continued access to low-cost, high-quality generic medicines.

It's all kidneys

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Computer-simulated modelling in the management of diabetes

Diabetes has many complications which can take decades to develop. Scores of therapies are now available for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, and the complications of diabete. People with diabetes vary widely in their risks and histories of diabetes-related complications. How, then, can we choose from the many treatment options which are currently on offer to people with the condition?

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