Japanese school programmes combat type 2 diabetes

So-called 'late onset diabetes' is now more widely termed Type 2 diabetes. And for very good reasons. It was previously the case that childhood and adolescent diabetes was nearly exclusively Type 1 diabetes and that Type 2 diabetes very rarely affected the young. Sadly, this is no longer true. As the spread of 'westernized' lifestyles gives rise to a steep increase in rates of obesity worldwide, Type 2 diabetes is rapidly emerging among children and adolescents.

Fighting fat: with TAF in Singapore

In 1992, the Singapore government noted that the obesity prevalence among schoolchildren was 14%. Singapore's population has a relatively high prevalence of diabetes, at 9.2%. Rates of obesity and overweight are high – 6% of the adult population has a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2, and around 25% have a BMI above 25 kg/m2. Recent years have also seen the increasing appearance of young onset Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose

Fetal origins of diabetes in developing countries

There is a rapidly rising epidemic of Type 2 diabetes throughout the world. It is particularly severe in developing countries. In 1995, 62% of people with diabetes in the world lived in developing countries. By 2025 this is predicted to rise to more than 75%. In India there are an estimated 25 million people with diabetes, and this will rise to more than 60 million by 2025. One in five people with diabetes in the world will then be Indian. A parallel rise in ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is also projected. Other developing countries will be similarly affected.

Lighting up diabetes in the Asian young: the ASDIAB study

Diabetes is increasing in epidemic proportions worldwide. The number of people with diabetes is currently estimated to amount to nearly 180 million in the over 140 IDF member countries. While a relatively large number of studies have so far been carried out into the causes and development of diabetes mellitus in the Caucasian populations, up until recently, data on the aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition in the Asian population was still relatively scarce. The Asian Young Diabetes (ASDIAB) Study, the most significant results of which are revealed below, was intended to fill this gap.

Poverty versus genes: the social context of Type 2 diabetes

Together with its 'twin sister', childhood obesity, Type 2 diabetes is spreading among young people around the world. This constitutes a serious public health problem; by their 30s, generations of young people will have been living with Type 2

International Diabetes Youth Ambassadors: dreaming, learning, doing

'Dreaming, learning, doing' is the inspirational slogan of the International Diabetes Youth Ambassadors (IDYA). As the former National Youth Advocate for the American Diabetes Association (ADA), Clare Rosenfeld received a multitude of e-mails from young people with diabetes around the world. Some asked for assistance; others for education. All of them shared a dream of one day seeing a cure for diabetes. This dream led Clare to contact Children with Diabetes (CWD), in the hope of creating a global programme to unite these young people.

Globesity: a crisis of growing proportions

In the United States, the latest data show that two out of three adults are overweight, and nearly one in three is obese. Alarmingly, similar trends are emerging around the world. In countries as diverse as the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Kuwait, and Mexico at least half the population is overweight and one in five is obese.

Obesity, diabetes, and the child

This article by Martin Silink explains why children are becoming obese. He describes the scope of the obesity epidemic and explains how this is thought to be linked to diabetes. He investigates the causes of unhealthy eating habits and the decline in physical activity, and shows how these are impacting on the health of the world's children.

The diabetes epidemic in full flight: forecasting the future

Were there warnings that diabetes would become the epidemic of the 21st century? In the early 1970s, Peter Bennett and co-workers reported on the extraordinarily high prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in Pima Native Americans. In 1975, we reported the high rates of diabetes in the Micronesian Nauruans in the Pacific. Similar findings followed in other Pacific and Asian island populations. They all indicated the potential for a future global epidemic.

Diabetes education and empowerment: a role for youth

In 1996, American Youth Understanding Diabetes Abroad (AYUDA) was set up by two teenagers after they had witnessed the economic and emotional hardships faced by José Gabriel and other young people living with diabetes in Latin America.They envisioned a youth-led organization that would educate young people with diabetes about diabetes issues, and help empower them to work effectively for positive change. AYUDA is now a growing organization, which campaigns to raise diabetes awareness and promote sustainable development for diabetes communities throughout the world.