Hope springs for young people with type 1 diabetes

The IDF Diabetes Atlas, 5th edition, estimates that worldwide 495,100 children below 15 years of age are living with diabetes. Added to this number would be as many or more young people aged between 15 and 25 years. Together with adults with type 1 diabetes, these 1 million plus children and young people face the challenge of living with a complex, life-threatening chronic disease, but in widely different circumstances.

Italy’s Giocampus – an effective publicprivate alliance against childhood obesity

Childhood obesity is a worsening social emergency. It affects even the youngest children and has become a major issue in schools throughout the developed world and beyond. In Italy, recent data from the Ministry of Health show that more than 1 million children, a quarter of all young people between 6 and 11 years old, are overweight; 12% of the child population is obese. In southern regions, the situation has reached staggering proportions: half of all children are overweight or obese. In fact, Italy is now third in the world for childhood obesity – behind the USA and Portugal.

The impact of food advertising to children – why we must protect our most vulnerable citizens

Protecting the junk-food generation - the need for international intervention

An unhealthy diet is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, so what can we do to help people eat healthily? An important step is to ensure that children are encouraged to eat healthy food, and are not subjected to marketing that promotes energy-dense food that is high in fat, sugar and salt. Justin Macmullan looks at profit-driven but potentially dangerous marketing practices, and calls for an international code of practice to prevent the children of today from becoming the junk-food generation of tomorrow.

IDF and Rotary - reaching out to fight diabetes from the grassroots

IDF is an organization of associations in over 160 countries around the world. As such, it is organized from the ground up. Local associations deliver the programmes of the Federation. While offering counsel and advice as well as access to best practices, IDF seeks to empower the local association. Rotary International is a similar organization. The world’s largest and oldest service club, it has over 1.2 million members in more than 33,000 clubs in 160 countries.

Improving self-care in young people with diabetes - the importance of self-efficacy

Young people are given responsibility in different ways and at different rates across cultures and families. However, families from different backgrounds face similar challenges in supporting the self-care of a young person with diabetes. Learning to consistently carry out daily diabetes self-care tasks involves the help and support of relevant people across the lifespan: parents, siblings, friends, extended family, spouses/partners, and ultimately, children.

Coping with diabetes and self-management: a teenage perspective

Diagnosed when he was 12 years old, Adam Elliot has had type 1 diabetes for nearly three years. He is currently a student at All Saints Catholic High School in Kanata, Ontario, Canada. In this article, he shares his experiences of type 1 diabetes and explains how self-management has made his life with the condition not just bearable but as he sees it ‘a real journey that I believe is providing me  with a lot of useful life lessons’.

School as a resource for nutritional education and physical activity

Environmental  factors,  such  as  lifestyle  and  dietary choices, play a key role in determining a child’s body weight. Omnipresent and relentless advertising for low-quality convenience foods together with an over-reliance during leisure hours on television, computers and video games are driving an alarming increase in the incidence of obesity-related non-communicable diseases like type 2 diabetes among young people worldwide.

The extraordinary challenges faced by young people with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Diabetes in young people is a heavy burden all over the world but it is particularly severe in developing countries. Although the condition is the same, the context can be very different. Young people with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo have to face a number of major challenges. They are perceived as having a ‘mysterious disease’ which requires a lot of attention on a daily basis throughout a lifetime. Belief in spells is quite common in Africa, and many families feel it is their responsibility to find the person responsible for causing the diabetes.

Meeting very special needs

President's editorial