Children

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Promoting opportunities, fighting against isolation in India

India is undergoing an economic transformation – a financial boom according to many. Among India’s strong points contributing to this positive economic climate is its enormous young population. The potential for productivity, savings and investments by this generation will increase in the future, and is driving up levels of investments and confidence in the Indian economy. However, such gains are cancelled out to a large degree by excessive healthcare spending.

"Hello, diabetes." Preventing DKA in children with a telephone hotline service

If a child with diabetes develops ketoacidosis, it is absolutely critical that his or her parents are able to contact a trained healthcare provider immediately, 24 hours a day. Many parents report particular difficulties finding an experienced paediatrician to manage this emergency at night, and during week-ends and holidays. It has been demonstrated that these difficult situations can be overcome effectively using widely available telephone technology.

Know the warning signs of diabetes in children - World Diabetes Day 2008

The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations. It is a multiple-stakeholder partnership that includes diabetes organizations and their members around the world and Official World Diabetes Day Partners. Each campaign is centred on a theme that is established by the IDF Executive Board and approved by the World Health Organization. This year sees the second half of a 24-month campaign focussing on diabetes in children and adolescents. The main campaign slogan is ‘Know the warning signs’.

South African children at risk for future diseases: the way forward

South Africa is a land of paradoxes. South Africans deservedly celebrated an exceptional Rugby World Cup victory in 2007, but we most definitely are not yet winning the battle against inactivity and overweight among the nation’s young people – which is placing them at substantial risk for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and certain types of cancer. South Africa has the added challenge of dealing with a double burden of disease: the chronic non-communicable diseases mentioned above and communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis.

Changing lifestyles and the epidemic of obesity among children in Pakistan

Over recent decades, there has been a worldwide increase in the number of people with obesity – currently around 300 million according to the International Obesity Task Force – and there are no signs of a slow-down. Furthermore, rates of overweight and obesity in adults and children are rising dramatically in developing countries. A large and growing body of evidence points to the transformation of lifestyles worldwide – over-consumption of energy-dense food and decreased physical activity – as the driving force behind this pandemic.

For children, for change - the Diabetes Youth Charter

Diabetes is a constant and daily challenge for children and adolescents, their parents and carers. Henk-Jan Aanstoot, a paediatric diabetologist, affirms that he is inspired and motivated to see many families dealing well with their condition. Very young children, teenagers and young adults all share the ability to teach him something important every day – about patience, commitment and an unbelievable desire to overcome adversity and to triumph. But there are serious shortcomings in the care afforded to these young people in developed as well as developing countries.

The metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents: the IDF consensus

The importance of identifying children who are at risk of developing the metabolic syndrome cannot be underestimated. The syndrome is a cluster of risk factors

Lifestyle education for children - some useful strategies

In many cases, overweight and obesity in children constitute a grim warning for future health: if no action is taken, an overweight or obese child is likely to grow into an overweight or obese adult with a series of chronic health problems – among them, type 2 diabetes. Indeed, obesity-related health conditions, including the metabolic syndrome – a strong risk factor for cardiovascular diseases – are increasingly prevalent among children around the world.

Young people's needs and priorities for improved support and education: a call for action

Most young people’s lives are hectic. They all involve a degree of chaos, and the usual trials and tribulations of friendships, romance, college, and so on. Add the diabetes into the mix, with its unique challenges, and the situation can feel overwhelming. The authors of this report, young people who have been living with diabetes for some years, have all met several diabetes healthcare providers. Unfortunately, although many adults involved in diabetes care are keen to help young people to make the most of their life, this does not always appear to be the case.

Providing support and education to children with diabetes - specific needs, specific care

Ground-breaking research findings from the end of the last century demonstrated that the disabling and potentially life-threatening chronic complications of type 1 diabetes can be delayed or prevented by early and intensive blood glucose control. However, this strict and demanding regimen can present a major challenge for young people with the condition.

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