Children

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Taking up the struggle to improve care: a journey with diabetes

During a meeting halfway through a 24-month project for the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), surrounded by well-known health professionals, Barbara Elster was asked her opinion on one of the subjects under discussion. Having expressed her views, she contemplated how she, a person with no formal medical training, had come to be in such esteemed medical company, involved in producing national guidelines on diabetes for the UK Government.

Insulin pump therapy in children and adolescents: risks and benefits

During the last decade, insulin pump therapy has gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. In some of the European and North American paediatric diabetes centres, more than half of the young people with diabetes try to simulate a normal pattern of insulin secretion by means of an insulin pump (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion).

From adolescence to adulthood: the transition from child to adult care

Adolescence, the period of transition from childhood to adulthood, is a key phase of human development. It is characterized by rapid changes – physical, sexual, psychological, emotional, cognitive, and social. The psychological imbalance that prevails during adolescence is particularly significant in people with diabetes as it often leads to a decline in self-care. This brings about a deterioration in blood glucose control, and creates difficulties that hamper the development of harmonious relationships between the young person with diabetes and his or her healthcare providers.

Redesigning the urban environment to promote physical activity in Southern India

Type 2 diabetes has become the most common metabolic disorder. Its prevalence is growing most rapidly among people in the developing world, primarily due to the rapid demographic and epidemiological changes in these regions. According to IDF, India currently leads the world with an estimated 41 million people with diabetes; this figure is predicted to increase to 66 million by 2025. The diabetes epidemic is more pronounced in urban areas in India, where rates of diabetes are roughly double those in rural areas.

Breastfeeding and diabetes - benefits and special needs

Breastfeeding has numerous advantages for mothers with diabetes and their babies. Nursing mothers have lower insulin requirements and better control of their blood glucose; breastfed babies may have a lower risk of developing diabetes themselves. Alison Stuebe describes these potential benefits and highlights the special needs of breastfeeding mothers with diabetes.

Childhood obesity: the unacceptable price of successful marketing

Children around the world are becoming increasingly vulnerable to overweight and obesity. The International Obesity Taskforce estimates that around 45 million of the world’s school-age children are obese – about 3% of the population of children under 5 years old. It is widely recognized that the modern transformation of lifestyles, including widespread sedentary behaviours and dramatic increases in the consumption of foods that are high in fat and sugar and low in nutrients, are behind the pandemic of obesity-related conditions, including type 2 diabetes.

Educating, supporting, understanding: a challenging role for parents of children with diabetes

Diabetes is a family affair. When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, a wide range of challenges affects parents and siblings. While the role of parents in day-to-day living with diabetes is subject to constant change according to the age of their child, it is always crucial. Families constantly experience their loved-one’s diabetes, in an emotional as well as a practical sense. Eveline van Gulik explores some of the challenges faced by parents of children with diabetes, and describes, from her own experience, the enormous impact on family life.

Growing up safe and sound

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

The BD commitment: diabetes education for all


Keeping insulin cool naturally - the DREAM Trust storage system

DREAM Trust is a non-government organization and registered charity in Nagpur, central India. In this region and indeed throughout the Indian sub-continent and the developing world, covering the medication needs of a child with diabetes requires many families to commit a quarter of their monthly income. The principal objective of DREAM Trust is to respond to these needs by providing insulin, accessories and healthcare free of charge to poor children with type 1 diabetes.

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