Toward a better future in Morocco

The rise in the number of people with diabetes in Morocco reflects current global trends. In step with the sharp and ongoing increase in levels of obesity in the urban populations, the prevalence of diabetes is rising. But while the threat of a full-blown diabetes epidemic in Morocco is growing, many people with the condition receive inadequate care as a result of shortages in human and medical resources, poor clinical facilities, and a lack of diabetes education.

Obesity and the metabolic syndrome in young people

As the number of children with obesity continues to grow, the health implications of the condition are becoming increasingly evident: an unprecedented epidemic of type 2 diabetes is emerging in obese and overweight young people. At the time of diagnosis of diabetes, cardiovascular disease may already be present, even in young adults. The close association between type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease led to the hypothesis that the two may arise from a common antecedent, the metabolic syndrome – a cluster of metabolic disorders.

'Double diabetes' in young people and how to treat it

In most countries around the world, there has been an increase in the number of children and young people with diabetes. While in general it is relatively easy to distinguish whether a child or teenager has type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, in some cases, young people have elements of both kinds of the condition. This new phenomenon has been labelled ‘double diabetes’ or ‘hybrid diabetes’. Francine Kaufman reports on the existence of double diabetes and the implications of this condition for the initial categorization and treatment of young people who are diagnosed with diabetes.

This is where we stand: the IDF position statements

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) continues to prepare and release the Federation’s position statements. Requests are received regularly for the opinion of IDF on topics as varied and, at times, controversial as sucrose and alcohol consumption. Martin Silink and Anne Pierson offer us an update on the position of IDF on the current diabetes issues.

A very bad start: smoking, pregnancy and diabetes

The disease process that leads to the development of type 2 diabetes may start in the womb at the very beginning of life. Fetal growth and birth weight are predictive of diabetes risk in later years. This suggests that the factors that influence the rate of fetal growth – and therefore birth weight – may also activate the process that leads to type 2 diabetes in adult life. It is well known that smoking during

Childhood obesity and type 2 diabetes: a growing public health challenge in UAE

In the oil-exporting Arab countries – Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) – the economic growth and development of the past three decades have been dramatic. This socio-economic progress has brought benefits to many people in the region, such as improved access to health care, education, and safe drinking water. However, economic development has set the scene for the

Improving the quality of life of young people with diabetes in Egypt

In 2000, a group of committed members of the diabetes community in Egypt, including parents of children with the condition and health-care professionals, established ‘Assistance to Youngsters with Diabetes’ (AYD). This is an ambitious project. The ultimate objective of AYD – which recently won the DAWN International Award – is to enhance the quality of life of children with diabetes in

Enhancing diabetes education and awareness using limited resources

In his Nobel Prize lecture, the writer VS Naipaul described from the point of view of a boy of Indian origin born in Trinidad in the 1930’s the ethnic and cultural diversity of this small southern Caribbean island state. In this culturally rich but challenging setting, with few available resources, diabetes educators have made significant advances in facilitating diabetes education in Trinidad and Tobago and in raising awareness of the condition countrywide. Zobida Ragbirsingh reports.

Empowering children with diabetes and their parents

When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, the news usually comes as a shock to all family members. This often provokes a crisis which is associated with grief and sadness; a complex scenario emerges. Children with diabetes and their parents often feel overwhelmed by the amount of knowledge required to effectively manage the condition. Parents and children experience feelings of guilt. Parents sometimes feel they may have been able to prevent their child's diabetes; children may blame themselves for an illness, and perceive the condition and its treatment as a form of punishment.

Website for kids offer support

With the advent of the internet and the World Wide Web came the perfect medium to unite families who have children with diabetes. Highly interactive, always available, I realized that the World Wide Web is ideal for an online community. In July 1995, I created Children with Diabetes,, the world’s first website devoted to families with children with diabetes.