Children

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Children reaching children: the Diabetic Counsellors in Training

The success of the Diabetic Counsellors in Training (CiTs) programme has not only been recognized locally but also internationally. The counsellors presented their programme at last year’s Pan Africa Congress held in Johannesburg and again at the 17th IDF Congress in Mexico City. At both congresses, their presentation received standing ovation. What is this revolutionary and dynamic movement out of Johannesburg, South Africa?

Complementing the medical team

The ‘Fundación Diabetes Juvenil de Chile’, the Chilean Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, a non-profit institution, was founded in 1988 by a group of parents of children with diabetes. The principal objective of the institution is to help all people using insulin by teaching modern techniques, observing treatment and promoting self-monitoring. The Foundation provides additional support to the medical team responsible for treating people with diabetes. This generally refers to the area of education.

Diabetes guidelines for kids

Diabetes is one of the most common long-term progressive diseases of childhood. In many parts of the world Type 1 diabetes in children is increasing by 3% to 5% each year. Type 2 diabetes is also declaring itself in younger and younger age groups. These children have a lifetime of diabetes ahead of them. In an effort to contribute to an improvement in the care and quality of life of young people with diabetes, the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) recently published comprehensive consensus guidelines.

Eating disorders and other vulnerabilities: a passing phase?

The metabolic control of diabetes tends to deteriorate during the adolescent years, and this deterioration is more pronounced in teenage girls than boys. Efforts to achieve and maintain excellent blood glucose control are more difficult and less successful in adolescents than in adults. This suggests that the teenage years are a highly vulnerable period for girls with Type 1 diabetes, a time when the risk for the later development of diabetes-related complications may become accelerated.

Girl power

Any girl will be able to tell you that life as a teenager comes with its own challenges. Mix these challenges with diabetes and you have a cocktail of perplexing bewilderment and confusion at times! These three testimonies from South Africa show that diabetes in the teenage years can be scary, but ultimately can make you a stronger person.

Listen to a voice

Listen to the voice of a young girl Lonnie, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 16. Imagine that she is deeply involved in the social security system. She lives with her mother and two siblings in a working class part of a small town. She is at a special school for problematic youth, and her carers are seriously concerned about how she is going to manager her diabetes.

The EASD 37th annual meeting in Glasgow

The 37th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) from 9-13 September, hosted by Diabetes UK, was the biggest meeting of the EASD to date. Ten thousand people in total attended the array of satellite symposia, lectures, poster sessions and the exhibition. However, the news of the terrorist attack in New York, shocking to everyone, dampened proceedings and caused logistical chaos for the American delegation. Following is a brief overview of some of the many interesting topics presented at the meeting.

The challenge to movers and shakers: broad strategies to prevent obesity and diabetes

We know that in both Western and Asian adults in the vulnerable overweight groups with impaired glucose tolerance, modest weight loss with specific changes in diet and physical activity can reduce the likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes. Marked weight loss in severely obese people with diabetes can also ameliorate the risks from their diabetes perhaps for a decade or more. However, clinical interventions to achieve this require intensive personal supervision, which,

Japanese school programmes combat type 2 diabetes

So-called 'late onset diabetes' is now more widely termed Type 2 diabetes. And for very good reasons. It was previously the case that childhood and adolescent diabetes was nearly exclusively Type 1 diabetes and that Type 2 diabetes very rarely affected the young. Sadly, this is no longer true. As the spread of 'westernized' lifestyles gives rise to a steep increase in rates of obesity worldwide, Type 2 diabetes is rapidly emerging among children and adolescents.

Fighting fat: with TAF in Singapore

In 1992, the Singapore government noted that the obesity prevalence among schoolchildren was 14%. Singapore's population has a relatively high prevalence of diabetes, at 9.2%. Rates of obesity and overweight are high – 6% of the adult population has a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2, and around 25% have a BMI above 25 kg/m2. Recent years have also seen the increasing appearance of young onset Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose

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