Chronic diseases

English

Creating a network to tackle diabetes and NCDs in Latin America

Diabetes has become a critical health issue in Latin America. From Mexico, in the north, to Argentina in the south, sweeping rural-urban migration and the worldwide nutrition transition to high-fat, low-nutrient processed foods – especially among poor people – are driving a potentially devastating explosion in the numbers of people affected by non-communicable disease (NCD). The diabetes population, estimated at around 16 million people, is set to double within a decade if effective steps are not taken in protect at-risk communities.

IDF and the global NCD alliance: united for health and development

Non-communicable diseases, including diabetes, heart disease and cancers, cause 8 million premature deaths every year in low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization estimates that global deaths from these diseases will continue to rise over the next 10 years, with the African region expected to see the highest relative increase (27%). An increasing body of evidence shows that the human and financial impact of disease is undermining the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

Who's who in the global NCD alliance?

The global community is waking up to the potentially calamitous impact across all regions of diabetes and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The numbers are alarming. In 2005, chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancers, accounted for 60% of deaths worldwide and almost half of the global burden of disease. Today, cardiovascular disease is the world's number one cause of mortality: 17 million deaths each year. The number of people with diabetes is set to rise from the current 238 million to 440 million by 2030.

The untold burden of the non-communicable disease epidemic

The recent Global Risks 2010 report issued by the World Economic Forum identifies chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as one of the most important threats to the world’s agenda and a severe risk for global economic loss. NCDs, including diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and cancer, are already extraordinarily costly to governments and the private sector, crowding out essential monies for needed government services and reducing profits.

This is your IDF - looking back, moving forward

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has led the global diabetes community for 60 years. Founded in Amsterdam, Holland, on 23 September 1950, IDF spent some years in London, UK, before setting up headquarters at its current location in Brussels, Belgium. It has developed into an umbrella organization of around 200 national diabetes associations, representing the interests of the increasing number of people with diabetes and those at risk.

Globalization and the dual burden in sub-Saharan Africa

In sub-Saharan Africa, infectious diseases still cause the majority (69%) of deaths; chronic non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and cancers, contribute around 25%. But this picture is changing as sub-Saharan Africa undergoes an epidemiological transition with a rapidly increasing chronic non-communicable disease burden.

Making a difference to global diabetes

President's editorial

A multidisciplinary effort to improve the quality of chronic disease care

Although chronic diseases are leading causes of death and disability, they are neglected elements of the global health agenda. Of all deaths worldwide in 2005, 60% were caused by chronic diseases – principally cardiovascular diseases and diabetes (32%), cancer (13%), and chronic respiratory diseases (7%). Because the increase in chronic diseases is underappreciated, and their economic impact underestimated, many countries take little interest in their prevention, and leave the responsibility for management to individuals.


The great awakening

President's editorial

Barriers to self-management in people affected by chronic disease

Diabetes healthcare providers are no strangers to the self-management model. Indeed, it could be said that diabetes is the field in which the self-management model has been most thoroughly developed and implemented. The marriage of expert clinical care with self-management by the individual is an ideal union and an increasingly common objective. It is an excellent goal – one that is achievable by many. Yet a number of systematic barriers to self-management exists.

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