Chronic diseases

English

Challenges to diabetes self-management in developing countries

In developing countries, financial and human resources are limited despite serious needs and multiple health challenges. More than three-quarters of the people with diabetes worldwide live in developing countries. Between 2000 and 2025, the rise in the number of people with the condition in these countries will be around 170%. In  the developing world, diabetes, like other chronic diseases, is often ignored in terms of healthcare priorities; the focus remains largely on immediate and acute care rather than on prevention.

A behavioural therapy approach to self-management: the Flinders Program

Chronic diseases, including diabetes, represent the most prevalent problem in healthcare today. They are the most common cause of disability and consume the largest part of health expenditures internationally. Most diabetes care is provided by people with diabetes and their family or supporters. Therefore, understanding how to enhance diabetes self-management is of primary importance in addressing this growing burden. The effective self-management of type 2 diabetes is closely linked to environmental factors and a person’s lifestyle.

Engaging in a shared vision for self-management: the WISE approach

In recent years, many initiatives from many sources have been aimed at improving people’s ability to manage a chronic medical condition – ranging from top-down policy programmes to small-scale projects developed by individuals. Work related to the care of people with diabetes has generally been at the forefront of this type of research. Policy-related programmes tend to focus on the most effective use of health services, and initiatives coming from individuals are more likely to be about sharing experiences of an effective treatment.

Time to start making good health sense

President's editorial

Improving access to education and care in Cambodia

Four years ago, when Cambodia’s first diabetes surveys were analysed, they surprised everyone: there were twice as many people with diabetes than had been expected – more than 250,000 people. However, the major donors supporting the country’s healthcare sector continue to distribute financial support in unequal shares.

Unite against non-communicable diseases - an urgent call to action

President's editorial

Further puzzles and uncertainties - and some progress

Editor-in-chief's editorial

Diabetes in Nauru: the price of economic wealth and westernization

While we may believe we understand the connection, Nauruans know first-hand, and perhaps better than anyone else, the bitter link between negative lifestyle change and one of its devastating consequences – type 2 diabetes. Located in the Central Pacific, 60 km south of the equator, Nauru is the smallest independent republic in the world. Its 10,000 inhabitants occupy a single coral island only 6 km long and 4 km wide. Approximately 80% of the population are indigenous Nauruans of Micronesian origin.

'Stomp the Fat' - an effective national weight-reduction campaign

Despite a fall in diabetes prevalence from around 35% in 1975 to 16% in 2004, obesity and non-communicable diseases, including type 2 diabetes, remain the primary threat to health and well-being confronting Nauru in the 21st century. Nauru has few natural resources and, with a population of only 10,000, does not have the critical mass to support manufacturing. Nor, with a tiny land mass of 21 km² and unfavourable topography and soil conditions, can it support farming.

Partnerships and knowledge - the enemies of disease

President's editorial

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