Awareness

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How to develop a diabetes association: a case study on the Icelandic Diabetes Association

In Issue 3 1999 of Diabetes Voice, Dr Ástrádur Hreidarsson of the Endocrinology and Diabetic Clinics at the National University Hospital in Iceland’s capital, Reykjavik, wrote about how diabetes care is managed in this sparsely populated country. In the past two years, many further developments have taken place as a result of a close cooperation between the Icelandic Diabetes Association and the other Nordic countries.

Brazilian website brings together people involved in diabetes

How much time is necessary to learn about the important discoveries on the treament of diabetes? Nowadays, only a couple of minutes. This is the importance of internet to millions of people with diabetes all over the world. The internet has shortened all the distances, opening a new channel of communication.

Delivering the message through effective advocacy

Diabetes is spreading across the world at an epidemic rate. Since making a decision to increase its attention to advocacy in 1994, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has led numerous successful advocacy efforts. Providing information to policy makers is crucial. Nevertheless, even with the economic facts in hand, it remains important to use them in such a way that will bring about governmental action to support research and programmes aimed at conquering diabetes.

Getting governements to listen to economic facts

Over £5.2 billion a year – 9 percent of the entire National Health Service budget – is spent on diabetes and its complications in the UK. There is no doubt that diabetes is a significant health economic issue here, as it is elsewhere in the world. Although diabetes is not consistently high on the government’s priority list, Diabetes UK has been successful in forming a strong lobby, which is increasing in political weight.

www.diabetesonestop.com - worth stopping for

The internet has everything you could wish to know about diabetes. The problem is finding it! Anyone looking for information needs an authoritative site which is fresh, independent, easy to navigate and, most of all, kept up to date. Dr Tony O’Sullivan, Honorary Secretary of the Irish Diabetes Association, took a look at www.diabetesonestop.com of the publishers John Wiley and Sons, UK, to see if it measures up. Dressed in full surfing gear, he cranked up his computer and took to the ether for a look around. This was his verdict.

World Diabetes Day 2001: diabetes and cardiovascular disease

Reducing the Burden: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease was the theme of World Diabetes Day this year, celebrated on 14 November, a date that has become central to the whole diabetes world. The date was chosen several years ago to commemorate the birth of Frederick Banting, the first who conceived the idea which lead to the discovery of insulin in 1921.

Regional highlights 2001: Regional Development Plan shows results

Five years after the introduction of the Regional Development Plan (RDP), which called for basic infrastructure to be put into place, the IDF’s seven Regions are showing the results of this investment. Regional strategic action plans now provide the framework for initiatives to improve the lives of people with diabetes. Developing educational courses strengthening strategic partnerships and improving communications were among the highlights of a very active and productive year

Diabetes to priority for Iranian National Advisory Committee

The first systematic epidemiological studies in Iran were begun in 1993. However, in light of the growing number of people with diabetes and the accruing costs, estimated to exceed US$400 million a year, a need was recognized in 1998 to study the more recent epidemiology of diabetes in Iran. In 1998 the National Committee for Diabetes was formed, and a project undertaken in 1999 involving nearly 2.5 million people. Many other substantial moves have been made in Iran to help deal with diabetes in the country.

Thinking global, acting local: World Diabetes Day 2001

All around the world on 14 November 2001, untold numbers of healthcare professionals, pharmacists, decision makers, and people with diabetes and their friends and families celebrated World Diabetes Day (WDD). Millions of people worldwide received the message that diabetes is now reaching epidemic proportions. Looking through the numerous reports and pictures we have received at the IDF Executive Office in Brussels, it is obvious that in just over a decade 14 November has become singularly the most important day of the year for raising global awareness about diabetes-related issues.

Atlas puts diabetes on the world map

“The spread of the western diet and couch-potato lifestyle has transformed diabetes, a ‘disease of affluence’ that now affects five percent of adults, into one of the world’s worst and fastest-growing health epidemics.” Financial Times, 6 November 2000. This was the thrust of the message read by thousands of people all over the world on the day the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched its first diabetes atlas, Diabetes Atlas 2000.

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