Awareness

English

World Diabetes Day 2001: diabetes and cardiovascular disease

Reducing the Burden: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease was the theme of World Diabetes Day this year, celebrated on 14 November, a date that has become central to the whole diabetes world. The date was chosen several years ago to commemorate the birth of Frederick Banting, the first who conceived the idea which lead to the discovery of insulin in 1921.

Regional highlights 2001: Regional Development Plan shows results

Five years after the introduction of the Regional Development Plan (RDP), which called for basic infrastructure to be put into place, the IDF’s seven Regions are showing the results of this investment. Regional strategic action plans now provide the framework for initiatives to improve the lives of people with diabetes. Developing educational courses strengthening strategic partnerships and improving communications were among the highlights of a very active and productive year

Diabetes to priority for Iranian National Advisory Committee

The first systematic epidemiological studies in Iran were begun in 1993. However, in light of the growing number of people with diabetes and the accruing costs, estimated to exceed US$400 million a year, a need was recognized in 1998 to study the more recent epidemiology of diabetes in Iran. In 1998 the National Committee for Diabetes was formed, and a project undertaken in 1999 involving nearly 2.5 million people. Many other substantial moves have been made in Iran to help deal with diabetes in the country.

Thinking global, acting local: World Diabetes Day 2001

All around the world on 14 November 2001, untold numbers of healthcare professionals, pharmacists, decision makers, and people with diabetes and their friends and families celebrated World Diabetes Day (WDD). Millions of people worldwide received the message that diabetes is now reaching epidemic proportions. Looking through the numerous reports and pictures we have received at the IDF Executive Office in Brussels, it is obvious that in just over a decade 14 November has become singularly the most important day of the year for raising global awareness about diabetes-related issues.

Atlas puts diabetes on the world map

“The spread of the western diet and couch-potato lifestyle has transformed diabetes, a ‘disease of affluence’ that now affects five percent of adults, into one of the world’s worst and fastest-growing health epidemics.” Financial Times, 6 November 2000. This was the thrust of the message read by thousands of people all over the world on the day the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched its first diabetes atlas, Diabetes Atlas 2000.

Diabetes education with a Bali flavour

Diabetes is on the increase in Indonesia, with prevalence rates now at 4.6% compared with 2% to 3% just five years ago. This means that some four million people throughout Indonesia, from Sumatra to Irian Jaya, currently have the condition. Bali, an Indonesian island with three million inhabitants, has trained 86 diabetes educators since 1996. The educators, who come from all over the island, are expected to be able to return to their local areas and spread their knowledge about diabetes.

Parallel pandemics

President's editorial

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: double jeopardy

Diabetes is closely associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), particularly heart attack, stroke and ischaemia of the lower limbs. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop these diseases compared to people without the condition. Recent evidence, however, tells us that it is possible to prevent or delay these complications. IDF is very aware of the scale of the problem, and has entered the 21st century with the issue high on its agenda. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease has been selected as the theme for this year’s World Diabetes Day campaign.

World Diabetes Day 2002: a bird's-eye view

This year the WDD theme of diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) played a more prominent role in the publicity surrounding WDD events than has been the case for previous themes. Diabetes is the world's primary cause of damage to vision and blindness. One of the specific objectives of WDD 2002 was to warn of the threat of irreversible retinopathy posed by the condition. The theme was taken up in order to campaign for improved provision of sight checks as a relatively low-cost method of prevention.

The Internet: a tool for advocacy

In the first of a series of articles on the role the internet can play as a tool for advocacy, we take a look at www.idf.org in order to highlight recent changes to our own website, explain how the present content can be exploited, and preview some of the plans we have for future development.

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