Awareness

English

Diabetes Action Now: WHO and IDF working together to raise awareness worldwide

Even among policy makers at an international and national level, awareness about the public health and clinical importance of diabetes remains low. Diabetes is widely perceived as a condition of low importance to the poorer populations in the world. In the low- and middle-income countries, the impact of diabetes is largely unrecognized. Yet the world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which will occur in the low- and middle-income countries.

The tide of man

President's editorial

Composing a new IDF triennium: the beat goes on

President's editorial

A diabetes presence

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Collaboration to support prevention

President's editorial

Diabetes and the World Health Organization

The aim of the World Health Organization (WHO) is the achievement of the highest possible level of health for all the world's people. From its global headquarters in Geneva and its Regional Offices, it assists national governments achieve this aim by setting international norms and standards, and providing leadership and technical support. WHO has substantial influence and prestige and has several major accomplishments to its credit, most notably the global eradication of smallpox in 1979, and major reductions in the burden of polio, leprosy, river blindness and tuberculosis.

Better product information: is direct advertising the answer?

In the last few years, there has been an important but little-publicized

Awareness and education in Egypt: the DELTA project

Egypt and some of the Gulf countries have among the highest prevalence rates of diabetes in the world, notably Type 2 diabetes. Changes in socio-economic patterns, relatively rapid urbanization, and a 'fast-food culture' are taking their toll. In Egypt and the Gulf region, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now a major health problem, and high blood cholesterol levels and hypertension are recognized as 'silent killers'. However, there is relatively little awareness of the serious threat to health presented by diabetes, or its role in causing CVD.

Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access: overcoming barriers to care

Over 80 years after the discovery of insulin, access to it is still problematic for people in many parts of the developing world. In February 2001, at a meeting between the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), a call was made for the establishment of a non-governmental organization to improve the sustainable, affordable and uninterrupted supply of quality insulin for people with Type 1 diabetes in areas of need.

Diabetes beyond healthcare

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

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