Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: double jeopardy

Diabetes is closely associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), particularly heart attack, stroke and ischaemia of the lower limbs. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop these diseases compared to people without the condition. Recent evidence, however, tells us that it is possible to prevent or delay these complications. IDF is very aware of the scale of the problem, and has entered the 21st century with the issue high on its agenda. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease has been selected as the theme for this year’s World Diabetes Day campaign.

World Diabetes Day 2002: a bird's-eye view

This year the WDD theme of diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) played a more prominent role in the publicity surrounding WDD events than has been the case for previous themes. Diabetes is the world's primary cause of damage to vision and blindness. One of the specific objectives of WDD 2002 was to warn of the threat of irreversible retinopathy posed by the condition. The theme was taken up in order to campaign for improved provision of sight checks as a relatively low-cost method of prevention.

The Internet: a tool for advocacy

In the first of a series of articles on the role the internet can play as a tool for advocacy, we take a look at in order to highlight recent changes to our own website, explain how the present content can be exploited, and preview some of the plans we have for future development.

Long way but real hope

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Diabetes research caught in the European spotlight

It all started in 1996, when the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) published a document entitled 'European Dimension of Diabetes Research'. Since then, enormous progress has been made towards a greater recognition of the relevance of diabetes research at European Union level.

Towards greater awareness

President's editorial

Thinking big to raise awareness in India: the mega diabetes show

According to World Health Organization (WHO) figures, 23 million people in India have diabetes, more than in any other country in the world. By 2025, this number is expected to increase to over 57 million. In other words, one in seven people in India will have diabetes. The increasing prevalence of diabetes seen throughout Asia is a reflection of the effects of westernization, urbanization, and mechanization, all of which are associated with a sedentary life style. Diabetes requires life-long treatment and impacts upon people's daily lives. It carries the risk of chronic complications.

IDF and WHO initiatives to put diabetes on the health agenda in Africa

Although the exact magnitude of the problem in Africa is not well understood, diabetes is a serious threat to public health throughout the continent. In 2003, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) predicted that by 2010, diabetes prevalence in Africa would increase by around 95%. Ignoring diabetes could lead to the breakdown of the fragile health systems in Africa, which are already overwhelmed by communicable diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

Diabetes Action Now: WHO and IDF working together to raise awareness worldwide

Even among policy makers at an international and national level, awareness about the public health and clinical importance of diabetes remains low. Diabetes is widely perceived as a condition of low importance to the poorer populations in the world. In the low- and middle-income countries, the impact of diabetes is largely unrecognized. Yet the world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which will occur in the low- and middle-income countries.

The tide of man

President's editorial