Awareness

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Diversity, debate and new directions

Targeting today’s most contemporary issues, the Basic and Clinical Science Stream may provide this year’s Congress with the biggest buzz, especially in areas of obesity, diabetes complications and new treatment strategies. A range of provocative topics including debates about driving type 2 diabetes prevention and bariatric surgery will be presented. Noteworthy speakers will discuss new treatment options for both types of diabetes and present the latest results of clinical trials. Mark Cooper and Sophia Zoungas talk about the exciting programme this year.


Breaking down barriers and living your dreams ... with diabetes

João Valente Nabais, President of the IDF European Region and development lead for the Living with Diabetes Stream, is passionate about the 2013 Melbourne programme. Living with type 1 diabetes since 1981, João has been an active diabetes advocate ever since his youth. This year, LWD delivers a unique opportunity for people to become inspired and work on realising dreams.

Why health matters to human development

Helen Clark, Administrator of the UN Development Programme, reflects on the development agenda post-2015 and explains how better prevention and care of Non-communicable Diseases fit into her vision for a broader development goal thereby decreasing the threat NCDs pose to progress.

Healthy Cities report

In our first Healthy Cities report, Diabetes Voice highlights municipal and national governing policies that are trailblazing new directions for human health.  

Gestational diabetes – an update from India

In recent decades, more women of a reproductive age have diabetes, and more pregnancies are complicated by pre-existing diabetes especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Also of concern is gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) - the type of diabetes that is first recognized during pregnancy and affects up to 15% of women worldwide.


W.A.S.H. away the world’s dietary salt

The world’s current dietary salt consumption, more than twice the daily amount recommended, is rubbing the wound of declining public health. Increasing evidence suggests that a high salt intake may directly increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity through soft drink consumption, and many other preventable diseases, including cancers. Restricting dietary salt is even more critical for high-risk populations, such as diabetes.

Debate: How low can you go? The low-down on the low carbohydrate debate in type 1 diabetes nutrition

As a means of representing relevant issues to the diabetes community, Diabetes Voice will be providing a forum in which experts can examine controversial issues and provide an argument supporting their point of view. The low carbohydrate debate marks the first in a series of many more to come.
 

Anthropometric indicators of obesity for identifying cardiometabolic risks in a rural Bangladeshi population – Chandra Diabetes Study

Professor Akhtar Hussain’s aim of studying anthropometric indicators of obesity was to evaluate the predictive ability of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentages for the presence of cardiometabolic risks—namely type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome.

Voices of type 1 diabetes: doing my best each and every day

Voices of type 1 diabetes is a new Diabetes Voice instalment reflecting the personal burden of diabetes in society. This new series will present individual stories from all over the world and provide an opportunity to appreciate different perspectives about life with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In this first edition, voices from the type 1 diabetes community share their thoughts about every day life beyond diagnosis.
 


The beating heart of diabetes

At the International Diabetes Federation, we consider ourselves the ‘global voice’ of diabetes - we have done for more than 60 years. We have become an influential advocate for people affected by diabetes, convincing the world’s leaders of the urgent need for concerted action to turn the tables on the world’s chronic disease pandemic.(1,2) Yet our reasons for existing are as they were upon IDF’s inception in 1950. We are driven by the needs of our constituents: people with diabetes.

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