Awareness

English

Who's who in the global NCD alliance?

The global community is waking up to the potentially calamitous impact across all regions of diabetes and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The numbers are alarming. In 2005, chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancers, accounted for 60% of deaths worldwide and almost half of the global burden of disease. Today, cardiovascular disease is the world's number one cause of mortality: 17 million deaths each year. The number of people with diabetes is set to rise from the current 238 million to 440 million by 2030.

This is your IDF - looking back, moving forward

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has led the global diabetes community for 60 years. Founded in Amsterdam, Holland, on 23 September 1950, IDF spent some years in London, UK, before setting up headquarters at its current location in Brussels, Belgium. It has developed into an umbrella organization of around 200 national diabetes associations, representing the interests of the increasing number of people with diabetes and those at risk.

Making a difference to global diabetes

President's editorial

Diabetes UK after 75 years - the way forward for a lasting association

Diabetes UK has come a long way. Since its humble beginnings in London in the early 20th century, when a handful of people with diabetes and medical professionals met in HG Wells’ London apartment, Diabetes UK has grown into a countrywide organization that is active in a range of fields, including advocacy for the rights of people with diabetes, scientific research, and public awareness-raising. In 2009, Diabetes UK, a key member association of the International Diabetes Federation, will celebrate its 75th anniversary at a national conference in Glasgow, UK.

Unite against non-communicable diseases - an urgent call to action

President's editorial

'Stomp the Fat' - an effective national weight-reduction campaign

Despite a fall in diabetes prevalence from around 35% in 1975 to 16% in 2004, obesity and non-communicable diseases, including type 2 diabetes, remain the primary threat to health and well-being confronting Nauru in the 21st century. Nauru has few natural resources and, with a population of only 10,000, does not have the critical mass to support manufacturing. Nor, with a tiny land mass of 21 km² and unfavourable topography and soil conditions, can it support farming.

Delivering hope, promise and support to Canadians living with diabetes

A staggering number of Canadians, 8.4 million, are currently living with diabetes or are at increased risk  of developing the condition during their lifetime. With 2.4 million affected by diabetes and 6 million in a state of ‘pre-diabetes’ – many of whom are unaware that they have impaired glucose tolerance – diabetes is an invisible, potentially deadly pandemic that affects a quarter of the Canadian population.

Education, advocacy, and support for research in Quebec

In this report, Serge Langlois provides information on the mission and objectives of Diabète Québec. Founded in 1954, Diabète Québec currently unites some 30,000 people with diabetes, healthcare professionals and around 50 affiliated associations that serve communities throughout Quebec – comprising a quarter of Canada’s population. The three pillars of Diabète Québec’s mission are to inform, raise awareness and prevent diabetes and its complications.


Turning points in the fight against diabetes

President's editorial

Know the warning signs of diabetes in children - World Diabetes Day 2008

The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations. It is a multiple-stakeholder partnership that includes diabetes organizations and their members around the world and Official World Diabetes Day Partners. Each campaign is centred on a theme that is established by the IDF Executive Board and approved by the World Health Organization. This year sees the second half of a 24-month campaign focussing on diabetes in children and adolescents. The main campaign slogan is ‘Know the warning signs’.

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