Awareness

English

Setting the advocacy agenda in a new dawn for diabetes and NCDs

2011 was undoubtedly a landmark year for diabetes and global health more broadly. The UN High-Level Meeting on Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs) in September changed the global health and development landscape forever. Diabetes and NCDs finally reached prominence when 193 UN Member States adopted the Political Declaration on NCDs and agreed to a set of commitments that has the potential to accelerate coordinated global progress that has been lacking for so long.

Calling the world to action on diabetes

IDF is gearing up for an exciting year. When heads of state convene at the UN headquarters in New York in September to discuss the scale of and solutions for diabetes and related non-communicable diseases (NCDs), we hope to witness commitments made as never before and a resource flow to match. The UN Summit on NCDs is undoubtedly the political opportunity of a lifetime for the global diabetes community. This is why IDF is launching a Year of Action for Diabetes.

The good, the bad and the ugly - treatment of diabetes in the cinema

Diabetes has a leading role in the current global epidemic of non-communicable diseases. But it has a rather ambiguous relationship with the ‘seventh art’. On the one hand, diabetes has made a number of high-profile appearances in blockbuster movies – which has helped to raise its profile among the general public. On the other, it remains underrepresented – only around a dozen films have dealt with the condition in the past 25 years – and is often distorted by the time it reaches the screen.

IDF and the global NCD alliance: united for health and development

Non-communicable diseases, including diabetes, heart disease and cancers, cause 8 million premature deaths every year in low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization estimates that global deaths from these diseases will continue to rise over the next 10 years, with the African region expected to see the highest relative increase (27%). An increasing body of evidence shows that the human and financial impact of disease is undermining the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

Who's who in the global NCD alliance?

The global community is waking up to the potentially calamitous impact across all regions of diabetes and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The numbers are alarming. In 2005, chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancers, accounted for 60% of deaths worldwide and almost half of the global burden of disease. Today, cardiovascular disease is the world's number one cause of mortality: 17 million deaths each year. The number of people with diabetes is set to rise from the current 238 million to 440 million by 2030.

This is your IDF - looking back, moving forward

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has led the global diabetes community for 60 years. Founded in Amsterdam, Holland, on 23 September 1950, IDF spent some years in London, UK, before setting up headquarters at its current location in Brussels, Belgium. It has developed into an umbrella organization of around 200 national diabetes associations, representing the interests of the increasing number of people with diabetes and those at risk.

Making a difference to global diabetes

President's editorial

Diabetes UK after 75 years - the way forward for a lasting association

Diabetes UK has come a long way. Since its humble beginnings in London in the early 20th century, when a handful of people with diabetes and medical professionals met in HG Wells’ London apartment, Diabetes UK has grown into a countrywide organization that is active in a range of fields, including advocacy for the rights of people with diabetes, scientific research, and public awareness-raising. In 2009, Diabetes UK, a key member association of the International Diabetes Federation, will celebrate its 75th anniversary at a national conference in Glasgow, UK.

Unite against non-communicable diseases - an urgent call to action

President's editorial

'Stomp the Fat' - an effective national weight-reduction campaign

Despite a fall in diabetes prevalence from around 35% in 1975 to 16% in 2004, obesity and non-communicable diseases, including type 2 diabetes, remain the primary threat to health and well-being confronting Nauru in the 21st century. Nauru has few natural resources and, with a population of only 10,000, does not have the critical mass to support manufacturing. Nor, with a tiny land mass of 21 km² and unfavourable topography and soil conditions, can it support farming.

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